Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge

Quick Facts

Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge

North Dakota

(701) 285-3341

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was established in 1935 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. It is an important link in a chain of refuges extending from the prairie lands of the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico. Located along the James River in east central North Dakota, Arrowwood NWR's 15,934 acres are made up of lakes, marshes, prairie grasslands, wooded coulees, and cultivated fields. As the James River meanders its way across the prairie, it passes through four main water areas - DePuy Marsh and Arrowwood, Mud, and Jim Lakes. These naturally occurring riverine lakes have control structures at their outlets. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was established in 1935 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. It is an important link in a chain of refuges extending from the prairie lands of the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico. Located along the James River in east central North Dakota, Arrowwood NWR's 15,934 acres are made up of lakes, marshes, prairie grasslands, wooded coulees, and cultivated fields. Warm days of spring and summer see many people enjoying the Refuge's Warbler Woodland Watchable Wildlife Area on the south-east end of Arrowwood lake. The area is open during daylight hours only. Rest rooms, tables, and grills are available. Arrowwood NWR is the administrative center for the Arrowwood NWR Complex. The Complex includes approximately 75,000 acres of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands in a nine-county area of central and eastern North Dakota. In addition to Arrowwood NWR, the following areas are part of the Complex: Chase Lake NWR and Wetland Management District (WMD), Valley City WMD, and Arrowwood WMD.

Map of Arrowwood NWR

Latitude, Longitude: 47.268514, -98.855152

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Activities

  • Boating

    All Refuge waters are open to non-motorized boating and canoeing during the same time that fishing is permitted. On Arrowwood and Jim lakes only, outboards up to 25HP are allowed during the same period.

  • Bird Watching

    The Warbler Woodland Watchable Wildlife Area lake shore and tour route road provide two excellent viewing areas to see some of the 250 species of bird that call the refuge home. Throughout April and early May, visitors can take advantage of a viewing blind to see dancing sharp tailed grouse. The blind is available for use by reservation only. A complete bird list can be accessed at

  • Auto/Motorcycle

    At the entrance to the 5.5 mile tour route, a leaflet is available that provides a description of various points of interest along the route. The route is also a good place to see some of the varied wildlife found on the Refuge. Early morning and evening visits are best for viewing wildlife. The tour route is closed during the waterfowl hunting season, but may be reopened during the winter months.

  • Fishing

    The Refuge lakes are shallow and generally provide only fair fishing for northern pike, bullhead and other fish. Occasional floods permit fish to move upstream into the Refuge from Jamestown Reservoir. When this happens, good fishing conditions exist on the refuge for several years after the flooding. Ice fishing is permitted on Arrowwood Lake and Jim Lake (south half of Mud Lake) after the firearms deer season and as soon as ice conditions are safe.

  • Hiking

    A nature trail is open to visitors.

  • Hunting

    Hunting is permitted for deer, late season upland game birds, fox, and cottontail rabbit. Hunting of other species is not permitted. Legal weapons are bow and arrow, state allowed firearms, and muzzle loaders. Non-toxic shot is required for all shotgun hunting. Raccoon, coyotes, and other animals may not be hunted.

  • Wildlife Watching

    Opportunities to observe wildlife in their natural habitat are numerous. Waterfowl, perching birds, owls, hawks, and even eagles, along with deer and other mammals, can be seen along the 5.5-mile auto tour route. Associated with the Warbler Woodland Watchable Wildlife Area is a short, interpreted hiking trail which winds through wooded draws, prairie grasslands, and along the lakeshore affording visitors many opportunities to observe wildlife, especially one of the more than 24 warbler species known to use the Refuge.

Directions

Driving

The Refuge headquarters is located 26 miles north of Jamestown and about 23 miles south of Carrington. From Jamestown, travel north on Highway 281 to Edmunds. At Edmunds, go east on County Road 44 for 5.5 miles and turn north on the headquarters road. From Carrington, travel south on Highway 281 to Edmunds. Turn east on County Road 44 for 5.5 miles, and turn north on the headquarters road. There are signs on Highway 281 and County Road 44 directing visitors to the headquarters.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(701) 285-3341

Links