Lyman Lake State Park

Quick Facts

Lyman Lake State Park

Arizona

(928) 337-4441

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

Created as an irrigation reservoir by damming the Little Colorado River, this 1,200-acre park encompasses the shoreline of a 1,500-acre reservoir at an elevation of 6,000 feet. It is fed by snow melt from the slopes of Mount Baldy and Escudilla Mountain, the second and third highest mountains in Arizona. Water is channeled into this river valley from a 790-square-mile watershed extending into New Mexico.

Because of its size, Lyman Lake is one of the few bodies of water in northeastern Arizona with no size restrictions on boats. The west end of the lake is buoyed off and restricted as a no wake area (5 mph). This allows the angler a chance at a variety of fish without the proximity of speedboats and water-skiers. The fishery consists of walleye, channel catfish and largemouth bass. The large remainder of the lake is open for all other types of water sports.

Lyman Lake really comes into its own during the spring, summer, and fall. Summer days, with temperature highs in the 80's to low 90's, are perfect for fishing, swimming, leisure boating, water-skiing, hiking or just plain relaxing.

Map of Lyman Lake (AZ)

Latitude, Longitude: 34.361647, -109.379540

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Activities

  • Boating

    There are two boat ramps at the park. One is a double wide, the other is a single lane. There are no restrictions on boat sizes. Canoes, kayaks, and other non-motorized watercraft may launch at either boat ramp.

  • Camping

    Camping Group Building: 1,128 sq. ft., fully enclosed building with two restrooms, a storage room, folding tables and chairs, indoor/outdoor lighting, electrical outlets, water, a cement patio with a large barbecue grill, picnic tables, heater, evaporative cooler, fire pit, boat dock, and fishing cove. The area is fenced off from the rest of the park. Tent camping sites and 11 full hook up sites with water, sewer, and electric are available for overnight camping. No hot water or showers are available at the building, but use of the campground showers is allows. Check out time is 2 pm. A non-refundable reservation deposit for one or more nights is required. Day use park entrance fees are in addition to the reservation fee. There is a minimum requirement of 6 paid camping units per night to reserve this area.

    Four one-room log camping cabins are available by reservation. They overlook Lyman Lake with covered wood porches and comfortable features. Cabins are furnished with 2 bunk beds with mattresses, a full size bed with mattress, 1 table, 4 chairs, electricity, light, heat, air conditioning, and a lockable door. Campers must supply their own linens. They are accessible by car and RV and equipped with electric hook-ups outside. Picnic tables and charcoal grills make for a well-equipped outdoor setting. Restrooms and showers are within walking distance. Cabins are available year-round. Cabins sleep up to four people, with a maximum capacity of six people.

    An unique experience at Lyman Lake, nestled in the park are yurts, offering an alternative camping experience. Yurts are circular, comfortable, lockable domed tents measuring 16 feet in diameter with a canvas shell, an open floor plan, and a skylight.

    Yurts are outfitted with 2 futons, 1 table, 4 chairs, and electricity. Yurts can be accessed by car and RV and provide picnic tables and charcoal grills. Restrooms and showers are within walking distance. Yurts are available March 15 through November 15. Yurts sleep up to four people, with a maximum capacity of six people. A non-refundable reservation deposit for one or more nights is required.

  • Fishing

    Anglers can catch largemouth bass, catfish, bluegill, carp and walleye at the park. Visitors may purchase a fishing license at the gift shop.

    A valid Arizona fishing license is required for anglers fourteen and older. Licensing information is available online at Arizona Game & Fish, or purchase a fishing license at a local dealer.

  • Hiking

    Rattlesnake Pointe Pueblo Trail: Rattlesnake Point Pueblo was a medium-sized village that was home to about 15 families between AD 1325 and 1390. It was one story tall and had between 80 and 90 rooms. The pueblo was built and occupied by the ancestors of the Hopi, and perhaps other, Pueblo Indian groups. When occupied, the architecture would have resembled that of historic pueblo villages. The pueblo sat on a long ridge overlooking the Little Colorado River. The fertile floodplain along the river was almost certainly farmed by the people living at Rattlesnake Point. Complete trail guide offered in visitor center. Rooms from this 14th century ruin can be viewed from a short trail. Tours are available through the Ranger Station on a seasonal basis.

    Historic villages, including Rattlesnake Point Pueblo, and the Lyman Lake rock art have continuing significance to contemporary Hopi people. They understand these sites as homes of their ancestors during their migrations and the petroglyphs as signs left by those migrating through the area.

    Peninsula Petroglyph Trail: This 1/4-mile self-guided trail is accessible from the campground and is open during daylight hours every day. The trail requires a mild climb.

    Ultimate Petroglyph Trail: This 1/2-mile, steeper trail on the east side of the lake can only be accessed by boat. Tours are available through the Ranger Station on a seasonal basis. Trail ends at Ultimate Rock, a large petroglyph-covered boulder.

  • Picnicking

    Group Ramada: 1,089 sq. ft. picnic ramada located in the day use area. It has a large central barbecue pit/grill, picnic tables, electric outlets, lights, water spigots, horseshoe pits, and a volleyball court. Restrooms and a store are close-by. This area can accommodate large groups. Day use park entrance fees are in addition to the reservation fee. There is a minimum of 6 paid entrance fees per day to reserve this area.

    Pointe Ramada: 289 sq. ft. picnic ramada located near water, close to the store, with 2-3 picnic tables, a barbecue grill, fire ring, and access to the nearby volleyball court and restrooms. Day use park entrance fees are in addition to the reservation fee.

    Store Ramada: 256 sq. ft. picnic ramada located just west of the store has 1 picnic table, a barbecue grill, and access to the nearby volleyball court and restrooms. Day use park entrance fees are in addition to the reservation fee.

    Reservations are on a first-come first-served basis. Reservations will be accepted for the following year beginning January 1st. Reservation fees must be received within 10 calendar days or another reservation can legally be accepted.

  • Water Sports

    This park has a designated swimming area with no lifeguard on duty. Swimming is taken at your own risk.

Seasonality/Weather

Lyman Lake is located at an elevation of approximately 6,000 feet about sea level in Apache County, Arizona. Summers are warm with temperatures in the mid to high 90s for several weeks. Summer evenings are cool to the low 70s and high 60s. Winters are cold with some heavy snow and temperatures can sometimes reach zero degrees Fahrenheit. Cell phone service is poor and seems to be dependent on the provider.

Directions

Driving

From Phoenix, AZ: Head west on W Washington St toward N 1st Ave, turn right at N 7th Ave. Turn right to merge onto I-10 E toward Tucson, take exit 147A to merge onto AZ-202 Loop E, take exit 13 for Country Club Dr. Turn left at AZ-87 N/N Country Club Dr, continue to follow AZ-87 N. Turn right at AZ-260 E, turn left at US-60 E/W Deuce of Clubs and continue to follow US-60 E. Turn left at US-180 W/US-191 N, then turn right at State Hwy 81.

Flying

Nearest airport is Pheonix, AZ.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(928) 337-4441

Links