Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef National Park

Animals

Mountain Lion

Mountain lions (Felis concolor) are also called cougars, pumas, panthers, painters, and catamounts. They roam throughout this area in both desert and mountain country, and are usually quiet and elusive. Although your chances of seeing one of these secretive animals is slight, they have been observed in and around Fruita in the campground, picnic areas, orchards and housing area. Typically, mountain lion sightings occur from a distance and usually around dawn or dusk. However, lions are unpredictable and can be dangerous.

Mountain lions are solitary animals, traveling alone except during mating season or when a female is supporting you. They can be seen at any time of the day or night, but are most active at dawn and dusk, corresponding with deer activity.

Mountain lions are carnivores (meat eaters) and prey mostly on deer. They also eat small animals like porcupines, rabbits, squirrels, marmots, and skunks.

The orchards in Fruita host a large deer population which in turn attracts mountain lions. Do not feed deer. Feeding deer encourages them to remain in close proximity to the campground. Avoid carcasses as lions will occasionally return to their kills to feed over several days. Do not leave pets outside at night.

If you encounter a lion, remember the goals is to convince it that you are not prey and that you may be dangerous. Follow these safety tips:

Please report all mountain lion sightings to the ranger at the visitor center.

Mammal Checklist

Capitol Reef National Park contains nearly a quarter million acres in the slickrock country of Utah. Wildlife is diverse because of a variety of habitats such as pinyon-juniper, perennial streams, dry washes and rock cliffs.

We solicit details of the wildlife seen by visitors because such information adds immeasurably to the value of the park records. Those species with an asterisk have been identified in or near the park. For others, Capitol Reef National Park lies within their known range. Mammals marked with an (E) are considered extinct from the park. The listing follows the format order of Burt and Grossenheider.

SORICIDAE

Shrews

  • Vagrant Shrew (Sorex vagrans) - nearly statewide in range, found in marshes, bogs, wet.meadows and along streams in forests; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Northern Water Shrew (Sorex palustris) - confined to cold, small streams with cover on the banks and in bogs in this area; possibly exists in North District; recorded in Fruita.
  • Dusky Shrew (Sorex obscurus) - found in marshes, coniferous forests, and dry hillsides; may exist in North District; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Gray Shrew* (Notiosorex crawfordi) - found in dry alluvial fans, sagebrush and other low desert shrub habitats in and areas; reported in South District.

VESPERTILIONIDAE

Common Bats

  • Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) - statewide in range; flies from dusk to dawn; erratic flight; migrates from north in fall; not reported from Capitol Reef.
  • Yuma Myotis (Myotis yumanensis) - statewide in range; late flier, usually close to ground; one of the most common of western myotis.
  • Long-eared Myotis (Myotis evotis) - statewide in range; flies late in low elevations and early at higher elevations; frequents thinly forested areas.
  • Long-legged Myotis* (Myotis volans) - statewide in range; flight less erratic than most myotis; frequents buildings, small pockets and crevices in rock ledges; confirmed in Fruita.
  • Small-footed Myotis* (Myotis leibii) - statewide in range; only slightly larger than California myotis; flies early in evening; recorded in Fruita and along east boundary near Utah 24.
  • Western Pipistrel* (Pipistrellus hesperus) - statewide in range; flies early in evening, sometimes before sundown; flight erratic; feeds near watercourses; observed in Fruita.
  • Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) - statewide in range; one of the most common and widely distributed of the bats; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Western Big-eared Bat* (Plecotus townsendi) - statewide in range; frequents caves and buildings; may be solitary; recorded in Fruita.
  • Pallid Bat* (Antrozous pallidus) - nearly statewide in range; flies late (10 p. m. or after in summer at Capitol ReeQ; feeds near the ground; females may carry young while feeding; confirmed in Fruita and along east boundary on Utah 24.

Other species of Myotis that may exist in Capitol Reef

  • Cave Myotis (Myotis velifer)
  • Fringed Myotis (Myotis thysanodes)
  • California Myotis (Myotis califomicus)
  • Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)
  • Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis)
  • Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)
  • Spotted Bat (Euderma maculata)
  • Mexican Big-eared Bat (Plecotus phyllotis)

MOLOSSIDAE

Freetail Bats

  • Mexican Freetail Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) - nearly statewide in range; flies at dusk and flies high and fast; most common and smallest freetail bat in its range.
  • Big Freetail Bat (Tadarida macrotis) - nearly statewide in range; flies when dark; not reported in Capitol Reef.

URSIDAE

Bears

  • Black Bear* (Ursus americanus) - ranges throughout mountainous areas of the United States; infrequently reported in mountainous areas of central and southern Utah; reported rarely in Capitol Reef.
  • (E) Grizzly Bear (Ursus horribilis) - originally statewide in mountainous areas of Utah; now thought to be extinct.

PROCYONIDAE

Raccoons & Ring-tailed Cats

  • Raccoon (Procyon rotor) - ranges in riparian habitats along the Colorado River and tributaries; recently raccoons reported near Green River and Caineville and seem to be expanding their range; not yet reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Ringtail* (Bassariscus astutus) - ranges in all but the northwestern corner of the state; found in rocky ridges and cliffs, usually near water; observed in Fruita and along Pleasant Creek.

MUSTELIDAE

Skunks, Badgers, Weasels, & Otters

  • Shorttail Weasel* (Mustela erminea) - ranges in all but extreme south of Utah; prefers brushy or wooded areas not far from water; may occur in North District; reported on Chimney Rock trail.
  • Longtail Weasel (Mustela frenata) - statewide in range; found in all land habitats near water and common in irrigated areas; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Mink* (Mustela vison) - ranges in Utah restricted to stream drainages or lakes near mountains; reported from Fremont River near east boundary; recorded in Fruita along Fremont River.
  • (E) River Otter (Lutra canadensis) - otters were observed on the Colorado River at Glen Canyon as late as 1938, possibly a few remain on isolated drainages; considered extinct in this area.
  • Badger* (Taxidea taxus) - statewide in range; prefers open grasslands and deserts; relatively common; reported from South District and near east boundary along Utah 24.
  • Spotted Skunk* (Spilogale putorius) - statewide in range; prefers brushy or sparsely wooded areas along streams and among boulders; observed in Fruita.
  • Striped Skunk* (Mephitis mephitis) - statewide in range; prefers semi-open country, brushland and open prairie within 2 miles of water; common in Fruita.

CANIDAE

Wolves & Foxes

  • Coyote* (Canis latrans) - statewide in range; prefers open woodlands, prairies, and brushy or boulder-strewn areas; reported from Fruits and other park locations.
  • (E) Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) - formerly statewide in range except for the western desert regions of the state; now thought to be extinct.
  • Red Fox* (Vulpes fulva) - thought to be statewide in range but some consider rare in Utah and occurring only in southern and southeastern parts of state; ranges seem to be expanding; reported from Capitol Reef in North District.
  • Gray Fox* (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) - ranges in all but extreme northwest of state; prefers open forests and rimrock country; abundant in Fruita.
  • Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotis) - range is in extreme western Utah and into desert areas of Nevada and Arizona but reports and indications are that this species is expanding its range; may rarely occur near Capitol Reef.

FELIDAE

Cats

  • Mountain Lion* (Fe x concolor) - statewide in range; infrequently reported or tracks observed in Fruita area.
  • Bobcat* (Lynx rufus) - statewide in range; reported from Muley Twist Canyon and Fruita.

SCIURIDAE

Squirrels & Marmots

  • Yellowbelly Marmot* (Marmota flaviventris) - generally confined to mountainous areas of the state to 3,650 meters (12,000 ft.) msl; hibernates 7-8 months of the year; abundant in Fruita area.
  • Whitetail Prairie Dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) - ranges are shown as eastern half of Utah but probably doesn't occur west of the Colorado River.
  • Utah Prairie Dog (Cynomys parvidens) - isolated populations west of Capitol Reef; on Rare and Endangered Species List; occurs in or near to the park in North District. (Spillet)
  • Rock Squirrel* (Spermophilus variegatus) - nearly statewide in range; prefers rocky canyons and boulderstrewn slopes; abundant in Fruita.
  • Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel* (Citellus lateralis) - generally confined to mountainous areas of the state; reported from Thousand Lake Mt. and North District.
  • Whitetail Antelope Squirrel* (Ammospermophilus leucurus) - nearly statewide in range; prefers low desert and foothills, sparse vegetation and scattered juniper trees; abundant throughout lower areas of park.
  • Least Chipmunk (Eutamias minimus) - statewide in range; prefers low sagebrush deserts, high mountain coniferous forests, probably in North District.
  • Cliff Chipmunk (Eutamias dorsalis) - ranges in all but southeast corner of the state; prefers pinyon pinejuniper slopes and lower edges of pines; probably occurs in North District; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Colorado Chipmunk* (Eutamias quadrivittatus) - ranges in southeast corner of the state; prefers coniferous forests, rocky slopes and ridges, commonly seen in pinyon-juniper associations; abundant in some years in Fruita.
  • Uinta Chipmunk (Eutamias umbrinus) - ranges generally throughout mountainous areas of the state; prefers coniferous forests up to timberline and rocky slopes; not reported from Capitol Reef.
  • Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) - statewide in range except for extreme western area; prefers spruce or hardwood forests; probably occurs in North District.
  • Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) - ranges through central mountainous areas of the state; prefers coniferous and mixed forests; nocturnal; may eat meat; reported from Boulder Mountain.

GEOMYIDAE

Pocket Gophers

  • Valley Pocket Gopher* (Thomomys bottae) - statewide in range; prefers loam soils but may occur in sandy or rocky situations of valleys and mountain meadows.
  • Northern Pocket Gopher (Thomomys talpoides) - ranges over eastern half of state; prefers grassy prairies, alpine meadows, brushy areas and open pine forests; probably occurs in North District; not reported from Capitol Reef.

HETEROMYIDAE

Kangaroo Rats & Pocket Mice

  • Great Basin Pocket Mouse (Perognathus parvus) ranges in western Utah and up the Colorado River; prefers sagebrush, pinyon and yellow pine areas; not reported in Capitol Reef, but probably occurs along Fremont River.
  • Ord's Kangaroo Rat* (Dipodomys ordii) - statewide in range; prefers sandy soil, but sometimes found on hard soils; recorded along east boundary.

CASTORIDAE

Beaver

  • Beaver* (Castor canadensis) - ranges statewide except for deserts of northwestern part of state; prefers streams or lakes with trees or willows on bank; observed in Fremont River and Halls Creek.

CRICETIDAE

New World Rats, Mice & Muskrat

  • Western Harvest Mouse* (Reithrodontomys megalotis) - statewide in range; prefers grassland, open desert, weed patches, and dense vegetation near water.
  • Canyon Mouse* (Peromyscus crinitus) - ranges statewide except for mountainous areas; prefers rocky canyons and slopes in and environments; most abundant mouse in park.
  • Deer Mouse* (Peromyscus maniculatus) - statewide in range; prefers dry-land habitat; most widely distributed and most variable member of white-footed mouse group.
  • Brush Mouse (Peromyscus boylei) - ranges statewide except for desert areas of extreme west; prefers chaparral areas of and and rocky situations.
  • Pinyon Mouse (Peromyscus truei) - ranges statewide except for mountainous areas; prefers rocky terrain with scattered pinyon pines and junipers.
  • Northern Grasshopper Mouse* (Onychomys leucogaster) - statewide in range; inhabitant of prairies and desert areas in low valleys where vegetation not too sparse; common in park.
  • Desert Woodrat* (Neotoma lepida) - ranges in western deserts of state and up Colorado River drainage; prefers desert floors or rocky slopes with scattered vegetation.
  • Bushytail Woodrat (Neotoma cinerea) - statewide in range; usually not found below the pines; probably occurs in North District; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Boreal Redback Vole (Clethrionomys gapperi) - ranges in central mountainous areas of the state; prefers coniferous, deciduous, or mixed forests close to source of water; possibly occurs in North District.
  • Mountain Vole (Microtus montanus) - ranges throughout state except in southeast corner; valleys and mountains of the state; undoubtedly occurs in Capitol Reef.
  • Richardson Vole (Microtus richardsoni) - ranges in central mountainous areas of the state; prefers creekbanks and marshes of the mountains to above timberline; not reported in Capitol Reef.
  • Longtail Vole (Microtus longicaudus) - statewide in range; prefers streambanks and mountain meadows, occasionally in dry situations; probably in North District.
  • Muskrat* (Odatra zibethica) - nearly statewide in range except for small area in western desert of the state; frequents marshes, edges of ponds, lakes, and streams; reported from Fremont River.

ZAPODIDAE

Jumping Mice

  • Western Jumping Mouse (Zapus princess) - ranges through central mountains of the state; a mountain species, found near streams and lush growths of grasses; possibly occurs in North District.

ERETHIZONTIDAE

Porcupine

  • Porcupine* (Erethizon dorsatum) - statewide in range; usually in forested areas but occasionally away from trees if brush is available; common in park.

LEPORIDAE

Rabbits & Hares

  • Whitetail Jackrabbit* (Lepus townsendi) - nearly statewide in range except for extreme south part of state; prefers open, grassy or sagebrush plains; rarely reported in Capitol Reef (Fruita and on U-24).
  • Snowshoe Hare (Lepus americanus) - ranges in central mountains of the state; a coniferous species in forests and thickets; possibly in North District.
  • Blacktail Jackrabbit* (Lepus califomicus) - nearly statewide in range; found in open prairies and sparsely vegetated deserts; reported parkwide.
  • Mountain Cottontail (Sylvilagus nuttali) - nearly statewide in range; found in thickets, sagebrush, loose rooks and cliffs, forests and mountains; not reported in park.
  • Desert Cottontail* (Sylvilagus auduboni) - nearly statewide in range except for extreme northwest corner of state; prefers open plains, foothills, and low valleys as well as grass, sagebrush, scattered pinyons and juniper areas; common in the park.

CERVIDAE

Deer, Elk & Moose

  • Mule Deer* (Odocoileus hemionus) - statewide in range, found from coniferous forests to desert shrub and grassland habitats; common in Fruita orchards.

ANTILOCAPRIDAE

Pronghorn Antelope

  • (E) Antelope (AntilOcapra americans) - reported from Wayne and Emery counties in 1922 and 1927; current range is east of Green River, Utah, and restored in vicinity of Loa, Utah; considered extinct from park area.

BOVIDAE

Bison, Sheep, Goats & Cattle

  • (E) Bison/Buffalo (Bison bison) - probably very wide in distribution before 1847, now restricted to an introduced herd that ranges between the Colorado River, Henry Mountains, and north of Hanksville; sometimes seen around Notom Road in park.
  • (E) Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) - very numerous in early historical records, last observation of native sheep in the park was in 1948 in Capitol Gorge; considered extinct from park area, but status may change with restocking.

Bird Checklist

Capitol Reef National Park contains nearly a quarter million acres within the slickrock country of southern Utah. The birdlife is diverse because of a variety of habitats such as pinyon-juniper, perennial streams, dry washes and rock cliffs.

Lists and details of the birds seen by visitors are solicited, as this adds immeasurably to the value of the park's records. Common names conform with the A. 0. U. Checklist of North American Birds (Seventh Edition, 1998).

The following is a key to abundance and occurrence:

ABUNDANCE

C – COMMON indicates that the species can usually be seen during the season indicated and in the appropriate habitat.
U – UNCOMMON indicates that the species is seldom or infrequently seen.
R – RARE indicates a very low possibility of encountering the species, although not out of normal range.
I – IRREGULAR indicates that a species may not be seen some years.
O – OCCASIONAL indicates a species seldom found in park and not reported annually.
A – ACCIDENTAL indicates that a species is out of its normal range and is not expected again.


STATUS

P – PERMANENT RESIDENT: Species remains within the park throughout the year.
S – SUMMER RESIDENT: Species remains within the park during the summer.
W – WINTER RESIDENT: Species remains within the park during the winter.
T – TRANSIENT: A species that migrates through the park in spring and/or fall.


 

LOONS  
_____ Common RT*
   
GREBES  
_____ Eared UT
_____ Pied-billed UT
   
PELICANS  
_____ American White RT
   
HERONS  
_____ Black-crowned Night O
_____ Great Blue US
_____ Green-backed* RS
   
EGRETS  
_____ Cattle O
_____ Snowy UT
   
IBISES  
_____ White-faced UT
   
(top of page)  
   
GEESE AND DUCKS  
_____ Canada Goose UT
_____ Snow Goose RT
_____ American Widgeon RT
_____ Blue-winged Teal RT
_____ Bufflehead UT
_____ Cinnamon Teal UT
_____ Common Golden eye UT
_____ Common Merganser US/UW
_____ Gadwall RT
_____ Green-winged Teal UT
_____ Lesser Scaup UT
_____ Mallard US/RW
_____ Northern Pintail RT
_____ Northern Shoveler UT
_____ Redhead RT
_____ Ring-necked Duck RT
_____ Ruddy Duck RT
_____ Wood Duck O
   
(top of page)  
   
HAWKS, FALCONS AND VULTURES  
_____ Turkey Vulture US
_____ Osprey O
_____ Bald Eagle RW
_____ Golden Eagle UP
_____ Northern Harrier UP
_____ Cooper's Hawk US/RW
_____ Northern Goshawk RP*
_____ Sharp-shinned Hawk UP
_____ Ferruginous Hawk RP
_____ Red-tailed Hawk UP
_____ Rough-legged Hawk RW
_____ Swainson's Hawk RS
_____ American Kestrel CP
_____ Merlin O
_____ Peregrine Falcon UP
_____ Prairie Falcon UP
   
GROUSE, PHEASANTS AND QUAIL  
_____ Blue Grouse UP*
_____ Chukar CP
_____ Gambel's Quail UP
_____ Ring-necked Pheasant RP
_____ Wild Turkey US
   
(top of page)  
   
COOTS AND RAILS  
_____ American Coot US/RW
_____ Sora RT
_____ Virginia Rail O
   
PLOVERS AND SANDPIPERS  
_____ American Avocet O
_____ Black-necked Stilt RT
_____ Killdeer US/RW
_____ Common Snipe RT
_____ Greater Yellowlegs O
_____ Lesser Yellowlegs O
_____ Long-billed Curlew RT
_____ Marbled Godwit O
_____ Solitary Sandpiper O
_____ Spotted Sandpiper US
_____ Western Sandpiper O
_____ Willet RT
_____ Wilson's Phalarope RT
   
GULLS  
_____ Franklin's O
   
DOVES AND PIGEONS  
_____ Band-tailed Pigeon US
_____ Mourning Dove CS/RW
_____ Rock Dove RS
_____ White-winged Dove O
   
CUCKOO'S  
_____ Yellow-billed RT
   
(top of page)  
   
OWLS  
_____ Burrowing RS
_____ Great Horned UP
_____ Flammulated RS*
_____ Northern Pygmy UP
_____ Northern Saw-whet Owl I
_____ Long-eared RP
_____ Short-eared RP
_____ Spotted RP
_____ Western Screech UP
   
GOATSUCKERS AND NIGHTHAWKS  
_____ Common Nighthawk US
_____ Common Poorwill US
   
SWIFTS  
_____ Vaux's O
_____ White-throated CS
   
HUMMINGBIRDS  
_____ Black-chinned CS
_____ Broad-tailed CS
_____ Calliope Hummingbird O
_____ Rufous CT
   
(top of page)  
   
KINGFISHERS  
_____ Belted RP
   
WOODPECKERS  
_____ Downy UP
_____ Hairy US/CW
_____ Ladder-backed O
_____ Lewis' RT
_____ Northern Flicker CP
_____ Red-naped Sapsucker CP
_____ Williamson's Sapsucker US*
   
FLYCATCHERS  
_____ Ash-throated US
_____ Black Phoebe RS
_____ Cassin's RS
_____ Cordilleran RS*
_____ Eastern Kingbird O
_____ Gray US
_____ Hammond's RT
_____ Olive-sided RS*
_____ Say's Phoebe CS
_____ Western Kingbird CS
_____ Western Wood-Pewee CS
_____ Willow RS
   
(top of page)  
   
LARKS  
_____ Horned CP
   
SWALLOWS  
_____ Bank US
_____ Barn UT
_____ Cliff US
_____ Northern Rough-winged CS
_____ Tree UT
_____ Violet-green CS
   
JAYS, MAGPIES AND RAVENS  
_____ Clark's Nutcracker UP
_____ Pinyon Jay CP
_____ Scrub Jay CP
_____ Steller's Jay UP*
_____ Black-billed Magpie CP
_____ Common Raven CP
   
CHICKADEES  
_____ Black-capped UP*
_____ Mountain UP*
   
(top of page)  
   
BUSHTITS AND TITMICE  
_____ Bushtit CP
_____ Juniper Titmouse CP
   
NUTHATCHES AND CREEPERS  
_____ Brown Creeper UP*
_____ Red-breasted Nuthatch UP*
_____ White-breasted Nuthatch UP
   
WRENS  
_____ Bewick's US
_____ Canyon CP
_____ House RT
_____ Marsh RT
_____ Rock CS/RW
_____ Winter RW
   
DIPPERS  
_____ American UP
   
(top of page)  
   
GNATCATCHERS AND KINGLETS  
_____ Blue-gray Gnatcatcher CS
_____ Golden-crowned Kinglet RT
_____ Ruby-crowned Kinglet CP
   
BLUEBIRDS AND THRUSHES  
_____ Mountain Bluebird US*/UT
_____ Western Bluebird US
_____ American Robin CP
_____ Hermit Thrush UT
_____ Swainson's Thrush RT
_____ Townsend's Solitaire RS*/UW
_____ Veery O
   
(top of page)  
   
THRASHERS  
_____ Gray Catbird RS
_____ Northern Mockingbird US
_____ Brown RS
_____ Sage US
   
PIPITS  
_____ American UT
   
WAXWINGS  
_____ Bohemian IW
_____ Cedar IW
   
SHRIKES  
_____ Loggerhead UP
_____ Northern RW
   
STARLINGS  
_____ European UP
   
VIREOS  
_____ Gray US
_____ Red-eyed O
_____ Solitary US
_____ Warbling US
   
(top of page)  
   
WARBLERS  
_____ American Redstart IT
_____ Black-and-white O
_____ Black-throated Gray US
_____ Common Yellowthroat RS
_____ Grace's RS
_____ Hooded O
_____ MacGillivray's US
_____ Nashville RT
_____ Northern Parula O
_____ Orange-crowned US
_____ Tennessee RT
_____ Townsend's RT
_____ Virginia's US
_____ Yellow CS
_____ Yellow-breasted Chat US
_____ Yellow-rumped CS
_____ Wilson's CT
_____ Northern Waterthrush O
   
TANAGERS  
_____ Summer O
_____ Western CS
   
(top of page)  
   
BUNTINGS  
_____ Lazuli CS
_____ Indigo RT
   
GROSBEAKS  
_____ Black-headed US
_____ Blue US
_____ Rose-breasted RT
   
SPARROWS  
_____ Dark-eyed Junco US*/CW
_____ American Tree RW
_____ Black-throated CS
_____ Brewer's US
_____ Chipping CS
_____ Harris' RW
_____ Lark US
_____ Lincoln's UT
_____ Sage US
_____ Savannah US
_____ Song US/RW
_____ Vesper US
_____ White-crowned CS/RW
_____ White-throated RT/RW
_____ Green-tailed Towhee US
_____ Rufous-sided Towhee CS/RW
_____ Lapland Longspur O
   
(top of page)  
   
BLACKBIRDS  
_____ Bobolink O
_____ Western Meadowlark UP
_____ Brewer's CS
_____ Red-winged CS/RW
_____ Yellow-headed US
_____ Common Grackle RS
_____ Brown-headed Cowbird CS
   
ORIOLES  
_____ Hooded O
_____ Northern CS
_____ Orchard O
_____ Scott's US
   
FINCHES  
_____ Cassin's RS
_____ House CS/RW
_____ Rosy IW
_____ Black Rosy-Finch IW
_____ American Goldfinch US/CT
_____ Lesser Goldfinch US/CT
_____ Pine Siskin UP*/CT
_____ Evening Grosbeak UW/UT
_____ Pine Grosbeak RP*
_____ Red Crossbill O
   
WEAVER FINCHES  
_____ House Sparrow RP

 

Amphibians

Capitol Reef National Park contains nearly a quarter million acres in the slickrock country of southern Utah. Wildlife is diverse because of a variety of habitats such as pinyon-juniper, perennial streams, dry washes and rock cliffs.

We solicit details of the wildlife seen by visitors because such information adds immeasurably to the value of the park records. Those species with an asterisk have been identified in or near the park. For others, Capitol Reef National Park lies within their known range.

SALAMANDERS

AMSYSTOMIDAE

Mole Salamanders

  • Tiger Salamander* (Ambystoma tigrinum) - 900 to 3,350 meters (3,000 to 11,000 ft.) msi; frequents quiet water ponds, reservoirs, lakes, temporary rain pools, and streams that do not contain predatory fish; dark olive colored in this area; recorded on Thousand Lake Mountain.

FROGS AND TOADS

PELOBATIDAE

Spadefoot Toads

  • Great Basin Spadefoot Toad* (Scaphiopus intermontanus) - 1,500 to 3,050 meters (5,000 to 10,000 ft.) msl; vertical pupils; enters permanent and semi-permanent water in response to rain, in dry weather burrows into the ground; reported from South District near Halls Creek; Indian Gulch; Moki Tanks; reported from South District near Halls Creek, the Fremont River, and tanks in the Waterpocket Fold.
  • Western Spadefoot Toad (Scaphiopus hammondi) - 900 to 1,800 meters (3,000 to 6,000 ft.) msl; vertical pupils, when handled, may smell like roasted peanuts and skin secretion may cause sneezing; probably does not occur with Great Basin spadefoot, but has similar habits.

BUFONIDAE

True Toads

  • Boreal Toad (Bufo boreas) - 1,219 to 3,350 meters (4,000 to 11,000 ft.) msl; meadows; white or cream-colored dorsal stripes and lack of cranian crests; reported from Torrey.
  • Rocky Mountain Toad* (Bufo woodhousei) - 900 to 2,600 meters (3,000 to 8,500 ft.) msl; white dorsal stripe, prominent cranial crests; riparian species along river courses and ditches; reported from Fruita, Torrey, the Fremont River, Halls Creek, Sulphur Creek and tanks in the Waterpocket Fold.
  • Red Spotted Toad (Bufo punctatus) - 900 to 2,000 meters (3,000 to 6,500 ft.) msl; flattened head and round parotoids; usually associated with rocks; reported from Fruita, along the Fremont River and in the South District.

HYLIDAE

Tree frogs

  • Canyon Treefrog* (Hyla arenicolor) - 900 to 2,750 meters (3,000 to 9,000 ft.) msl; intermittent streams with rocky pools; prominent toe pads; recorded at south boundary in Halls Creek, and often numerous in Fountain Tanks.
  • Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris triseriata) - 2,125 to 3,350 meters (7,000 to 11,000 ft.) msl; without toe pads; grassy pools, lakes, and marshes; not reported from Capitol Reef area, probably occurs at high elevations near Capitol Reef.

RANIDAE

True Frogs

  • Leopard Frog* (Rana pipiens) - 900 to 3,350 meters (3,000 to 11,000 ft.) msl; oval or round dark spots with pale borders; frequents permanent water areas; reported from Fruita and Torrey; also observed along Fremont River, Grover, south boundary in Halls Creek.

Fish

Capitol Reef National Park contains nearly a quarter million acres in the slickrock country of southern Utah. Wildlife is diverse because of a variety of habitats such as pinyon-juniper, perennial streams, dry washes and rock cliffs.

We solicit details of the wildlife seen by visitors because such information adds immeasurably to the value of the park records. Those species with an asterisk have been identified in or near the park. For others, Capitol Reef National Park lies within their known range.


SALMONIDAE

Trout & Chars

  • Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) - native to Europe but probably introduced into the West before 1900; thrives in the Fremont River because of tolerance to warm water.
  • Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdnerii) - introduced from the Pacific Coast of the United States; lives well in both cold and warm water.
  • Cutthroat Trout (Salmo clarkii) - native to Utah and the Intermountain Region; hybridizes with Rainbow trout.
  • Brook Trout (Saivelinus fontinalis) - introduced to the West from the Northeastern part of the United States; found in some cold water streams that flow into the Fremont River.

CATOSTOMIDAE

Suckers

  • Flannelmouth Sucker (Catostomus latipinnis) - native to the Colorado River system; herbivorous; ascends streams in the spring to spawn.
  • Bluehead Sucker (Pantosteus delphinus) - native to the Colorado River system; usually found in riffles of the streams; feeds on algae, slime, and aquatic insect larvae.

CYPRINIDAE

Chubs, Dance, Minnows & Shiners

  • Speckled Dace (Rhinichthys osculus) - native to the Fremont River where it is the most abundant fish; prefers rubble-strewn riffle areas; feeds on algae and other plant materials as well as small crustaceans, insect larvae, and small snails.
  • Utah Chub (Gila atraria) - introduced into the Fremont River as bait by fishermen; native habitat is the Bonneville Basin; generalized feeder, consuming higher plants, algae, terrestrial and aquatic insects, snails, crustaceans, and small fish; spawns during July.
  • Leatherside Minnow (Gila copei) - found in the Fremont River; feeding and habits probably similar to the Utah chub.
  • Redside Shiner (Richardsonius balteatus) - introduced into the Fremont River, native to Bonneville and Columbia River basins; feeds on small aquatic insect larvae, crustaceans, and some plant debris; spawns in late June.

ICTALURIDAE

North American Catfishes

  • Black Bullhead (ictalurus melas) - occasionally found in Halls Creek near the southern park boundary where it undoubtedly migrates from Lake Powell; black bullhead is adaptable to a wide range of aquatic conditions but shows preference for more quiet and muddier parts of a stream.

CENTRARCHIDAE

Sunfishes

  • Bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus) - occasionally found in Halls Creek where it undoubtedly migrates from Lake Powell; feeds on mollusks, crustaceans, insect larvae, and occasionally on small fish and aquatic plants.

COTTIDAE

Sculpins

  • Mottled Sculpin (Cottus bairdi) - probably introduced into the Fremont River from the Bonneville system; carnivorous, a bottom feeder utilizing insect larvae, crustaceans, small fish and snails.