Carlton Pond WPA

Quick Facts

Carlton Pond WPA

Maine

(207) 827-6138

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area is a 1,055-acre man-made pond and wetland located in the town of Troy in Waldo County. The pond is formed by an earthen dam which backs up Carlton Brook. The area was acquired by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1966 to protect the waterfowl and other wildlife associated with this area in Central Maine. The original dam at Carlton Pond was a rock structure built in 1850 to provide water power for a sawmill operation. In 1972, the Fish and Wildlife Service reconstructed the dam to maintain the integrity of the structure and to assure continued maintenance of the open water, marsh, and wetland areas created by the original dam. A natural overflow near the structure provides an additional escape route for high water thereby affording extra protection for the dam and control structures. A right-of-way provides access to the dam for maintenance and public use. Carlton Pond is one of the few areas in the state which provides nesting habitat for black terns, which are on the endangered species list maintained by the State of Maine. State and federal non-game biologists and researchers have been monitoring black tern use of Carlton Pond WPA and other areas for several years in an attempt to better determine the species' population status.

Carlton Pond WPA has historically provided good nesting habitat for waterfowl and other birds. To date, 33 bird species have been observed using refuge lands and waters. Many bird species that use Carlton Pond have been listed by the Partners-in-Flight organization as species that are declining. Slender Blue Flag, a species listed as Threatened by the State of Maine, has been sighted at Carlton Pond.

Map of Carlton Pond WPA

Latitude, Longitude: 44.695871, -69.275665

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Activities

  • Boating

    Boating and fishing are allowed on refuge waters. Fishing regulations follow those issued by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

  • Fishing

    Boating and fishing are allowed on refuge waters. Fishing regulations follow those issued by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

  • Hiking

    The park contains some walking trails that visitors can stroll on.

  • Hunting

    The refuge is open to all hunting seasons established by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. Nox-toxic shot is required for all seasons other than those for big game, and no baiting is allowed during any hunting season.

Park Partners

The Friends of Sunkhaze Meadows NWR

The Friends of Sunkhaze Meadows NWR is a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to protecting Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. The Friends group is involved in many activities including building boardwalks, trail maintenance, and community outreach. Once a peat bog destined to be destroyed by a peat mining company, Sunkhaze Meadows is now a sanctuary for a variety of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish and insects.

(207) 236-6970

Directions

Driving

Carlton Pond WPA is a satellite refuge managed by the staff of Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. To get to Carlton Pond, turn east from U.S. 202 in Troy, Maine onto Maine Route 220. Follow Route 220 for about three miles until Bog Road is seen on your right. Bog Road crosses over Carlton Pond after about ½ mile. A small parking area exists on the right at this point.

The refuge headquarters is located in Rockland, Maine. Follow U.S. Route 1 to the intersection with route 73 in downtown Rockland. Turn south on to route 73 for ¼ mile then turn left onto Water Street. The office is a large white building on your right.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(207) 827-6138

Links