Caving

Cave Spring Park

Have a great time at this park! Some of the amenities include: Located on Mill Street in beautiful Cave Spring, this 10 acre park serves as a practice facility for youth sports teams. Basketball, picnic, playground, football, soccer, softball, baseball, tennis, ...

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Gorge Metro Park

Mary Campbell Cave, a massive cliff overhang which once served as a home to Native Americans. Natural Scene The Gorge probably was cut during the past 12,000 years, after glacial debris blocked the former route of the Cuyahoga River near modern downtown Akron ...

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Lincoln Caverns & Whisper Rocks

Experience a one hour interpretive tour of two spectaular crystal caverns, Lincoln Caverns and Whisper Rocks. A wide variety of speleothems (cave formations), including delicate crystals, sparkling stalactites, and massive flowstones, await around every turn! Tours leave every few minutes during regularly scheduled hours and by appointment ...

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tallpedro
Where can I buy just the Yellowstone Oh, Ranger! guide book?
This question relates to the items listed below. Click each link for more information
Yellowstone National Park, Archaeology, Food/Dining, Boating, Geology, Flora & Fauna, Caving, Camping, Climbing, Fishing, History/Culture, Hiking, Kids Activities, Lodging, Park Passes and Fees, Photography, Hunting, Preservation, Volcanology, Picnicking, Regional Activities, RVing, Tennis, Touring, Water Sports, Winter Sports
5 years ago
0
Answers
ask_erica
24 Answers
2Helpful Answer Rating

Thanks for your interest in our Oh, Ranger! Yellowstone National Park guide. Many park visitors love our handy little booklet. The best way to get a copy is to call us at 212-581-3380. We'd be happy to ship a copy in the mail.

5 years ago
00
omey81
I just want to start out at Moon Lake then leave there and backpack into Brown Duck, and spend 2, maybe 3 days there.
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Ashley National Forest, Moon Lake Reservoir, Utah, Backpacking, Civil War, Fly Fishing, Trail Running, Wildlife Watching, Food/Dining, Mountaineering, Native American History, Deer, Lake Fishing, World War II, Elk, Gear, Marine Life, Moose, Wildflowers, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, History/Culture, Hiking, Park Passes and Fees, Photography, Preservation, Safety, Picnicking
5 years ago
0
Answers
ask_erica
24 Answers
2Helpful Answer Rating

It's a short day hike from Moon Lake Campgrounds to the Brown Duck Trail. There's plenty of camping opportunities in nearby East Basin. Please note some trail areas may be inaccessible due to winter weather. For more information, visit the Forest Service's page on Ashley National Forest: http://www.fs.usda.gov/ashley. Have a fun and safe adventure!

5 years ago
00
rfisher
I am quite interested in becoming a Park Ranger and was wondering what the marketability and annual pay of a Park Ranger is like.
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Canaan Resort State Park, West Virginia, Susquehanna State Park, Maryland, Archaeology, ATVs, Backpacking, Bears, Bouldering, Bow Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Biking, Downhill Skiing, Four-Wheel Driving, Gun Hunting, Wildlife Watching, Native American History, Swimming, Deer, Lake Fishing, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Marine Life, Moose, Flora & Fauna, Mountain Lions, Historic Sites, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, Fishing, History/Culture, Golfing, Hiking, Hunting, Preservation, Picnicking
6 years ago
0
Answers
Expert Answer
85 Answers
31Helpful Answer Rating

We often get questions about what it takes to become a National Park Ranger. Here are some tips from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers. We hope you find them helpful:

The National Park Service (NPS) employs people in all kinds of job titles (20,000 year-round and another 7,000 - 10,000 during the summer) even though the general public often thinks that everyone that works for the NPS is a "park ranger."  Of these 30,000 employees, perhaps 7,000 are in positions that are titled park ranger.  I'll concentrate on those for now, but folks interested in maintenance jobs, or administrative jobs, or research and science related jobs should know that those jobs are there too.
 
Park ranger jobs are divided into 2 groups.  First, there are park rangers that primarily perform park interpretation.  These employees work in the park visitors' center, lead guided walks and talks, give off-site programs at local schools, establish and/or modify the park's website, write site-specific brochures and other materials, and design visitor center displays or movies, etc.  In short, this group of park rangers is the parks' primary link between the park resources and park visitors and neighbors.  By explaining the national significance of the individual park and the resources it preserves, interpretive park rangers hope to establish or strengthen visitors' understanding and support for parks, the environment, history, etc.
 
The second group of park rangers are those that primarily perform park protection.  These employees perform law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency medical services, fire management, etc.  They are more likely to be working outside, in all kinds of weather conditions, and they might be doing this in all kinds of modes of transportation, i.e. on foot, on horseback, in vehicles, in boats, on skis, in small planes, etc.  Like interpretive rangers, protection rangers have a great responsibility to be knowledgeable about the parks' resources and threats (from human behavior) to them.  While they have many friendly, informational contacts with visitors, they also have visitor contacts that are sometimes confrontational and can be stressful.
 
For either type of ranger job, a bachelor's degree from a 4-year college or university with a heavy emphasis in the natural sciences or U.S. history is generally required to be competitive.  Any public speaking experience one can gain is also very helpful.  First aid training is available in most communities and having some level of certification in first aid and CPR is helpful.  There is also free online training to anyone at the Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands at Indiana University. Such training helps one understand the NPS mission and culture and shows prospective hiring officials that you are truly interested in becoming an NPS employee.
 
Many folks that hope to be interpretive park rangers often start out working as park volunteers while they are in school or are in some other full-time career.  These opportunities are available at all NPS sites including Lake Mead National Recreation Area just outside Las Vegas.
 
For protection rangers there are a few additional requirements.  You must be at least 21 years old.  You also must be a graduate of one of the NPS-approved Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Academies.  A list of these schools and more information is available online. One can also pursue similar opportunities in your home community to gain experience that might make you more competitive.  Become an ambulance attendant in your community, become a volunteer firefighter with your local fire department or your state forestry department, or become a member of your local community search and rescue squad.
 
Finally, the Association of National Park Rangers (ANPR) is a membership organization open to anyone.  One does not have to be a park ranger or an NPS employee to become an ANPR member.  There are networking and informational opportunities within ANPR that can help one be competitive for NPS jobs, and it is important to understand that it is not just what you know, but also who you know that will help one get their foot in the door with the NPS.  ANPR also offers a publication for sale titled, "Live the Adventure: Join the National Park Service" that can be helpful in understanding the requirements for park ranger jobs.  

For more information about ANPR visit their website.

6 years ago
10
Come Explore the Wonder of Wind Cave National Park

October 12, 2011, 9:27 am
By: Heather Crowley South Dakota’s Black Hills region draws in millions of tourists every single year. Desiring to experience the best the state has to offer, a common loop involves a few distinct parks. While planning their vacations, many map out a trek to the famed Mount Rushmore, stunning Badlands ...

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Wind Cave : Boxwork formations at Wind Cave
Boxwork formations at W...
Ask_Kelly
Wind Cave
Go Batty at the 54th Annual Bat Flight Breakfast at Carlsbad Caverns

July 6, 2011, 12:12 pm
By Naomi Legros As the beginning of summer takes flight into a full-length adventure of fun and excitement, the annual Bat Flight Breakfast, a celebration of bats’ morning return flight, will be held at the Carlsbad Caverns National Park on July 16th, 2011 from 5 a.m to 7 a.m. This ...

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kyguy01
When was the most active sink-hole forming period in the Mammouth Cave area.
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Kentucky, Archaeology, Caving
6 years ago
0
Answers
samwalsh
40 Answers
5Helpful Answer Rating

As you approach the vincinity of Mammoth Cave, several clues suggest the existence of caves. Road cuts along highways have vertical exposures of layered grayish rock, often broken into irregular blocks at the top where erosion has widened vertical cracks across layers. Between the layers you may see the tiny openings in the limestone that are the first stage in the formation of a cave.

The landscape along the highway also has special characteristics. You will not see surface streams. Instead, you will see myriads of crater-like depressions called "sinkholes." These sinkholes are places where run-off may quickly enter the limestone aquifer. Cave drains carry the dissolved limestone away, and the surface soil settles, creating the bowl-shaped depression. If the sinkholes drains become plugged with soil, then the water cannot drain underground and a pond forms. Occasionally the drain becomes unplugged and a pond as large as several acres will disappear overnight.

This kind of landscape is calledkarst topography. It is found along and to the southeast of Interstate 65 near Mammoth Cave National Park and referred to as the Sinkhole plain. At its southeast edge, surface streams sink underground joining the drainage of thousands of sinkholes. Continuing northwest they become the underground rivers of Mammoth Cave.

Driving northwest from Cave City or Park City, you start to climb a line of bluffs rising some 300 feet above the sinkhole plain. These bluffs are the Chester Escarpment—the border between the unprotected limestone of the Sinkhole Plain and the Mammoth Cave Plateau.


6 years ago
01
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