Fly Fishing

msdnichol...
Are there any wheelchair accomandations in Arizona for parks for an easy to get around park?
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Arizona, Fly Fishing, Bird Watching, Deer, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Mountain Lions, Wildflowers, Park Passes and Fees, Photography
11 years ago
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All Arizona State Parks provide accessible access to parking areas, visitor centers, restrooms, and picnic ramadas. For more information about specific facilities, special services or group access for people with disabilities, please contact the ADA Coordinator at (602) 364-0632. TTY service is available at (602) 542-4174.

More information is also available at www.AZStateParks.com.

11 years ago
00
scotkirk
Visiting Kalaloch, Sol Duc & Quinault WA with 9 and 5 year old girls - ideas, tips, suggestions would be very appreciated Things and places
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Washington, Canoeing, Mountain Biking, Fly Fishing, Lake Fishing
11 years ago
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Are the girls fans of the "Twilight" book series? If they are, they'll be excited to find out that Kalaloch is minutes away from Forks, the town where “Twilight” takes place. The nearby Kalaloch Lodge is surrounded by miles of peaceful beaches and beautiful forests that provide the ideal landscape for Twilighters to do some fantasy sightseeing.

Also consider booking a lake or rainforest tour or exploring these areas on your own!

If you're traveling in the fall, some great hotel deals are available at hotels in the region.

Some great tips from the Just for Kids section of our guide to Mount Rainier, Olympic and North Cascades are listed below:

Become a Junior Ranger.
Learn about the park’s plants and animals by picking up a Junior Ranger booklet ($1 donation requested) at any visitor center or ranger station. Complete the activities inside to earn your Junior Ranger badge.
 
Get your hands on a Discovery Pack.
Imagine how much better you could explore the park if you had nature guides, maps, a journal and binoculars! Borrow a Discovery Pack for a $5 donation at the Olympic National Park, Hurricane Ridge or Hoh Visitor Centers or the Storm King, Kalaloch or Quinault Information Stations.
 
Take a Hike.
Many short nature trails have self-guiding booklets and are great fun. Hike the 0.75-mile Hall of Mosses Trail in the Hoh Rain Forest or the one-mile Quinault Loop Trail at Lake Quinault in the Olympic National Forest.
 
See, Hear and Touch.
At the Children’s Discovery Room at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles, you can hold a deer antler, feel a bit of animal fur or listen to a coyote howl. You can also dress as a ranger and visit a “mini” ranger station, solve giant puzzles, and more!
 
Walk with a Park Ranger.
Get the real scoop on nature during a guided walk. On a forest walk, see if you can find a banana slug, a salamander or maybe even a Roosevelt elk! On a tide pool walk, look for sea stars or watch an octopus turn colors.

11 years ago
00
bleedheav...
How do I get to soldier lakes in Idaho?
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Backpacking, Canoeing, Fly Fishing, Kayaking, Lake Fishing, Camping, Hiking
11 years ago
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Ask_Elif
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Hello bleedheavymetal,

Soldier Lakes--Patrol Ridge Loop is located 42 road miles north of Stanley, ID.

To get to the trailhead, drive northwest from Stanley on Idaho Highway 21 for 18.6 miles, and then turn left onto the gravel road. Almost immediately, you'll turn right again onto another gravel road. (From here, it's 21 miles to the trailhead at Josephus Lake.) You'll then cross over Marsh Lake on a bridge and come to a fork in the road--stay left and follow the road over Vanity Summit. 

As you descend from Vanity Summit, you'll be on a graded dirt road that only has one and a half lanes, and is often steep. Be careful. Around 16 miles from ID 21, you'll reach the Float Creek Road and Rapid River junction. Stay left and follow Float Creek Road for 5 miles. There's room for about 5 cars at the Josephus Lake Trailhead parking lot.

Hike the trail for 3 miles, and you'll hit Soldier Lakes.

I hope this helps! Remember to come back to OhRanger.com to post pictures and comments about your trip to Soldier Lakes.


11 years ago
10
Fly Fishing

Creeks brimming with trout, rivers teeming with perch, and resvoirs awash with salmon lure in fly fishers with snares in tow. This ancient sport has been engaging anglers for over 2,000 years, peaking in America in the early 1920s in the states of Maine, Vermont, and Wisconson. The appropriate fly fishing gear can make or break your fishing trip, so be sure to arrive prepared with a lightweight rod, a line, and the appropriate fly for the spot you're fishing. Bag and possession limits vary by species and by area, so be sure to check current park regulations.

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Vaughn Baker
This "park in the sky," which captures the full grandeur of the Rocky Mountains, is one of our country's most frequently visited national parks, attracting more than three million visitors each year. 76 of the great mountains in the park reach elevations of 12,000 feet or more. Forests of spruce and fir tower over wide valleys where aspen and willow line hundreds of streams and lakes. At the highest elevations, above the tree line, is the fascinating, arctic-like alpine tundra, fraught with blizzards in winter and filled with flowered meadows in summer.
Park Acreage: 
265828
Highest Point: 
Longs Peak
Highest Point Elevation: 
14255 feet
Visitor Count: 
2743676
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
Yes
Park Sights: 
Stanley Hotel; Grand Lake; Rocky Mountains; Trail Ridge Road; Old Fall River Road; Lawn Lake; Fall River Area
Endangered Species: 
Boreal Toad (threatened); Bald Eagle (threatened); Least Tern; Mexican Spotted Owl (threatened); Piping Plover (threatened); Whooping Crane; Yellow-billed Cuckoo (threatened); Bonytail; Colorado Pikeminnow; Greenback Cutthroat Trout (threatened); Humpback Chub; Pallid Sturgeon (threatened); Razorback Sucker; Canada Lynx (threatened); Preble's Meadow Jumping Mouse (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Individual Pass (valid for 7 days): $10; Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $20; Commercial Tour Fees: $25-$200 (varies depending on seating capacity); Annual Park Pass: $35
Nearest Major City: 
Estes Park, CO
Gateway Communities: 
Estes Park, CO; Grand Lake, CO; Glen Haven, CO; Drake, CO; Allenspark, CO; Granby, CO; Lyons, CO; Hot Sulphur Springs, CO; Tabernash, CO; Hygiene, CO; Ward, CO; Masonville, CO; Parshall, CO; Loveland, CO; Fraser, CO; Winter Park, CO; Longmont, CO
Nearby Airports: 
Denver International Airport (DIA)

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North Cascades National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Chip Jenkins
It is difficult to describe the majesty of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Words like magnificent, vast and rugged only hint at the awesome nature of this portion of the expansive Cascade Range. Nestled in the northwest corner of Washington State, North Cascades National Park offers a pristine wilderness spotted with archeological sites and ancient fossil remains.
Park Open Info: 
Year-round; North Cascades Scenic Highway opens mid-April
Park Closed Info: 
Year-round; North Cascades Scenic Highway closes mid-November
Park Acreage: 
684302
Highest Point: 
Goode Mountain
Highest Point Elevation: 
9220 feet
Visitor Count: 
400000
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Lake Chelan; Cascade Mountains; Marblemount Curation Facility; Gorge Diablo; Ross Lake; Stephen Mather Wilderness; Stehekin; North Cascades Institute; North Cascades Environmental Learning Center
Endangered Species: 
American Peregrine Falcon (threatened); Common Loon; Golden Eagle; Gray Wolf; Grizzly Bear; Harlequin Duck; Marbled Murrelet; North American Lynx; Northern Goshawk; Nothern Spotted Owl; Pacific Fisher; Pacific Western "Townsend's" Big-Eared Bat; Pileated Woodpecker; Vaux's Swifts; Western Gray Squirrel; Bald Eagle (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Seattle, WA
Gateway Communities: 
Sedro-Woolley, WA; Winthrop, WA; Chelan, WA
Nearby Airports: 
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA); Yakima Air Terminal (YKM); Portland International Airport (PDX)

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Olympic National Park

Superintendent Name: 
William Laitner

Olympic National Park adds sparkling lakes and temperate rain forest to the natural landscape of Washington state, making it one of the great outdoor destinations in America all year-round.

Park Acreage: 
922651
Highest Point: 
Mount Olympus
Highest Point Elevation: 
7969 feet
Visitor Count: 
2749197
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Hurricane Ridge; Elwha; Lake Crescent; Sol Duc; Ozette; Rialto Beach; Hoh Rain Forest; Kalaloch Beach; Queet Valley; Quinault Valley; Staircase
Endangered Species: 
Northern Spottted Owl; Marbled Murrelet; Grizzly Bear
Entrance Fees: 
Individual Pass (valid for 7 days): $5; Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $15; Olympic National Park Annual Pass: $30
Nearest Major City: 
Port Angeles, WA
Gateway Communities: 
Port Angeles, WA; Carlsborg, WA; Sequim, WA; Joyce, WA; Forks, WA; Beaver, WA; Chimacum, WA
Nearby Airports: 
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA); William R. Fairchild International Airport (CLM)

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