Four-Wheel Driving

Elise M.

I'm an Interpreter I with California State Parks.  I've been working as an interpreter for almost 9 years and I've worked in 8 parks.  I've been lucky enough to work in some of the most scenic and historic places in our state!  I've also worked for East Bay Regional Park District and National Park Service.
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Capitol Reef, Waterpocket Fold, Land of the Sleeping Rainbow—all are colorful names to describe a park with many striking characteristics.

Waterpocket Fold, the main feature of the park, is the name of a 100-mile-long fold in the earth's surface. This uplift contains innumerable eroded basins or pockets that hold thousands of gallons of rainwater. These pockets of water have affected the history of humanity within the park and the flora and fauna of the region.

Entering the park from the west gives the most impressive view of the 1,000-foot-high stone barrier into which erosive forces have sculpted fascinating canyons, mesas, buttes and mazes. Once in the park, other astonishing panoramas await you.

Within a short distance of the visitor center, you will see Capitol Dome, Chimney Rock, the Goosenecks and the Egyptian Temple. Hickman Bridge, the Golden Throne and Capitol Gorge reward you after easy to moderate hikes. Prehistoric petroglyphs, the Fruita Schoolhouse, the Gifford Farmhouse and the Behunin Cabin speak of bygone eras and can be reached by car. The 20-mile round-trip Scenic Drive will take you past the Ripple Rock Nature Center and many of the park's features.

If you are seeking a remote wilderness experience, Capitol Reef has it. To the north of Route 24, dirt roads, which generally require high-clearance or 4-wheel-drive vehicles, lead into the park's north end through the heart of Cathedral Valley, an area of monolithic formations of Entrada and Curtis sandstones, some of which are 500 feet high. South of Route 24, graded roads, usually suitable for high-clearance vehicles, lead into some very fine hiking country. Besides good hiking opportunities, the southern part of the park also offers spectacular views of the folded strata of Capitol Reef and the Henry Mountains. Muley Twist Canyon is in the southern end of the park, as is Brimhall Bridge. Check with a park ranger before setting out for any of these more remote locations. Weather conditions may make the roads slick and impassable.

9 years ago
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Virginia ...
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I made a custom essay and I found that it is located on the Waterpocket Fold in central Utah, Capitol Reef National Park offers rugged, beautiful scenery with deep and narrow canyons, spectacular vistas, great expanses of slickrock and multi-colored rock layers exposed by the massive fold in the earth's crust. Petroglyphs give evidence of the early inhabitants of the area dating back at least 10,000 years. The area also has a more recent history in evidence with the orchards and buildings from the Fruita community that was founded by Mormon pioneers in 1880.
9 years ago
01
klm052305
Are quads allowed in yellowstone, If not can you suggest a means to get off the main roads and really get some site seeing done?
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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, ATVs, Four-Wheel Driving, Safety
10 years ago
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Off-road vehicles are prohibited in Yellowstone and most national parks. In spite of these restrictions, it is easy to get off-the-beaten track into the backcountry. My favorite is on foot… you'll quickly escape the crowds of the frontcountry a mere one or two miles off the loop road. The hike to Slough Creek in Tower country has breathtaking landscapes, lots of opportunities to see wildlife and great flyfishing. For more hikes, check out

 If you are eager to cover more ground and want to spend an extended period in the backcountry, consider taking a guided stock trip. Guided stock trips into the backcountry (on horse or llama) may be arranged with one of the stock outfitters licensed to operate in Yellowstone (see http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/stockbusn.htm).

You may also bring private stock into the park. PLease note that overnight stock use is not permitted prior to July 1, due to range readiness and/or wet trail conditions. Horses are not allowed in frontcountry campgrounds, but are permitted in certain backcountry campsites.

For information on planning a backcountry trip with stock please see the online Backcountry trip planner (available at http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/backcountrytripplanner.htm) or call the Backcountry Office at (307) 344-2160.

10 years ago
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rjsracing
When do I need an off road permit. Have Jeep and Motor home.
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Arizona, Four-Wheel Driving, Park Passes and Fees, Off Highway Vehicles, RVing
10 years ago
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It's best to check with the specific location you plan to visit, as the rules vary depending on which agency manages the public land and can also vary from site to site, even within a given agency. For example, the National Park Service generally prohibits driving off designated roads, though there are a few exceptions such as Canyonlands, which is in Utah and definitely worth a trip one day if you haven't already visited. Arizona State Parks require a permit for Off Highway Vehicles; however, this does not apply to pickup trucks, SUVs, cars and RVs. To find out more about the specific destination you have in mind in Arizona, check out http://azstateparks.com/OHV/permits.html and, if you're venturing off road into the backcountry, learn the basic safety requirements and always let someone know your itinerary before you depart, just in case of emergency.

Have fun and be sure to visit OhRanger.com to share your experience with other park-lovers.  

10 years ago
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Things To Do

Things To Do Whether you're stopping by for an hour or planning a two-week vacation, Canyonlands offers many ways to spend your time in the park. Boating The Colorado and Green Rivers have played a significant role in shaping the landscape of Canyonlands, and both offer an interesting way to visit the ...

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Four-wheel Driving

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Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Superintendent Name: 
Meg Jensen

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park is the point where the Chugach, Wrangell and St. Elias mountain ranges all converge in what is often referred to as the "mountain kingdom of North America." This is the largest unit of the National Park System. The park includes the continent's largest assemblage of glaciers and the greatest collection of peaks above 16,000 feet.

Park Open Info: 
Year-round (many park facilities close during the winter season)
Park Closed Info: 
Year-round (many park facilities close during the winter season)
Park Acreage: 
1.31881
Highest Point: 
Mount Saint Elias
Highest Point Elevation: 
18008 feet
Visitor Count: 
50336
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Mount St. Elias; Kennecott; Chitina; Liberty Falls Trail; Nabesna; McCarthy Road; Root Glacier Trail
Endangered Species: 
Grizzly Bear; Lynx; Stellar Sea-lion (threatened); Kittlitz's Murrelets (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Anchorage, AK
Gateway Communities: 
McCarthy, AK; Nabesna, AK; Slana, AK; Galkana, AK; Chitina, AK; Glennallen, AK; Tok, AK; Valdez, AK; Cordova, AK
Nearby Airports: 
Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)

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Death Valley National Park

Superintendent Name: 
J T Reynolds
Death Valley is world renowned for its colorful and complex geology. Its extremes of elevation support a great diversity of life, and provide a natural geologic museum that represents a substantial portion of the earth's history. This region is also the ancestral homeland of the Timbisha Shoshone Tribe. The Timbisha took advantage of the natural order of this region, establishing a pattern of life in concert with nature.
Park Acreage: 
3.3724e+06
Highest Point: 
Telescope Peak
Highest Point Elevation: 
11048 feet
Visitor Count: 
744440
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Scotty's Castle; Rhyolite Ghost Town; Ballarat; Chloride City; Greenwater; Harrisburg; Leadfield; Panamint City; Skidoo
Endangered Species: 
Devils Hole Pupfish; Eureka Dunes Evening-Primrose; Western Snowy Plover; California Least Turn; Southwestern Willow Flycatcher; San Clemente Loggerhead Shrike
Entrance Fees: 
Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $20; Individual Pass (valid for 7 days): $10
Nearest Major City: 
Pahrump, NV
Gateway Communities: 
Death Valley, CA; Darwin, CA; Amargosa Valley, NV; Beatty, NV; Keeler, CA
Nearby Airports: 
Las Vegas McCarran International Airport (LAS); Furnace Creek (LO6)

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Canyonlands National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Tony Schetzsle
Welcome to Canyonlands National Park's colorful landscape, which has eroded into countless canyons, mesas and buttes by the Colorado River and its tributaries. The rivers divide the park into four districts, including the Island in the Sky, the Needles, the Maze and the rivers themselves. While these areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, each retains its own character and offers different opportunities for exploration.
Park Acreage: 
337598
Highest Point: 
Cedar Mesa
Highest Point Elevation: 
6987 feet
Visitor Count: 
392537
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Green River; Colorado River; White Rim; Tower Ruin; Island in the Sky; Grand View Point Overlook; Cataract Canyon; Upheaval Dome; The Maze; Land of Standing Rocks; The Doll House; The Fins; The Great Gallery; The Needles District
Endangered Species: 
Colorado Pikeminnow; Razorback Sucker; Humpback Chub; Bonytail Chub; Southwest Willow Flycatcher
Entrance Fees: 
Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $10; InIndividual Pass (valid for 7 days): $5; Local Passport (valid for 1 year and applies to Arches, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges and Hovenweep): $25
Nearest Major City: 
Moab, UT
Gateway Communities: 
Moab, UT; Monticello, UT
Nearby Airports: 
Grand Junction Regional Airport (GJT); Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC)

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