Mountain Biking

Bolinas Ridge

 From the top of Bolinas Ridge take in bird’s-eye views up and down the San Andreas Rift Zone. The fault divides Olema Valley, a lovely, undulating landscape reminiscent of England, that dips slowly down to the waters of Tomales Bay in the north, and Bolinas Lagoon in the south. ...

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rfisher
I am quite interested in becoming a Park Ranger and was wondering what the marketability and annual pay of a Park Ranger is like.
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Canaan Resort State Park, West Virginia, Susquehanna State Park, Maryland, Archaeology, ATVs, Backpacking, Bears, Bouldering, Bow Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Biking, Downhill Skiing, Four-Wheel Driving, Gun Hunting, Wildlife Watching, Native American History, Swimming, Deer, Lake Fishing, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Marine Life, Moose, Flora & Fauna, Mountain Lions, Historic Sites, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, Fishing, History/Culture, Golfing, Hiking, Hunting, Preservation, Picnicking
5 years ago
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Expert Answer
85 Answers
31Helpful Answer Rating

We often get questions about what it takes to become a National Park Ranger. Here are some tips from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers. We hope you find them helpful:

The National Park Service (NPS) employs people in all kinds of job titles (20,000 year-round and another 7,000 - 10,000 during the summer) even though the general public often thinks that everyone that works for the NPS is a "park ranger."  Of these 30,000 employees, perhaps 7,000 are in positions that are titled park ranger.  I'll concentrate on those for now, but folks interested in maintenance jobs, or administrative jobs, or research and science related jobs should know that those jobs are there too.
 
Park ranger jobs are divided into 2 groups.  First, there are park rangers that primarily perform park interpretation.  These employees work in the park visitors' center, lead guided walks and talks, give off-site programs at local schools, establish and/or modify the park's website, write site-specific brochures and other materials, and design visitor center displays or movies, etc.  In short, this group of park rangers is the parks' primary link between the park resources and park visitors and neighbors.  By explaining the national significance of the individual park and the resources it preserves, interpretive park rangers hope to establish or strengthen visitors' understanding and support for parks, the environment, history, etc.
 
The second group of park rangers are those that primarily perform park protection.  These employees perform law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency medical services, fire management, etc.  They are more likely to be working outside, in all kinds of weather conditions, and they might be doing this in all kinds of modes of transportation, i.e. on foot, on horseback, in vehicles, in boats, on skis, in small planes, etc.  Like interpretive rangers, protection rangers have a great responsibility to be knowledgeable about the parks' resources and threats (from human behavior) to them.  While they have many friendly, informational contacts with visitors, they also have visitor contacts that are sometimes confrontational and can be stressful.
 
For either type of ranger job, a bachelor's degree from a 4-year college or university with a heavy emphasis in the natural sciences or U.S. history is generally required to be competitive.  Any public speaking experience one can gain is also very helpful.  First aid training is available in most communities and having some level of certification in first aid and CPR is helpful.  There is also free online training to anyone at the Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands at Indiana University. Such training helps one understand the NPS mission and culture and shows prospective hiring officials that you are truly interested in becoming an NPS employee.
 
Many folks that hope to be interpretive park rangers often start out working as park volunteers while they are in school or are in some other full-time career.  These opportunities are available at all NPS sites including Lake Mead National Recreation Area just outside Las Vegas.
 
For protection rangers there are a few additional requirements.  You must be at least 21 years old.  You also must be a graduate of one of the NPS-approved Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Academies.  A list of these schools and more information is available online. One can also pursue similar opportunities in your home community to gain experience that might make you more competitive.  Become an ambulance attendant in your community, become a volunteer firefighter with your local fire department or your state forestry department, or become a member of your local community search and rescue squad.
 
Finally, the Association of National Park Rangers (ANPR) is a membership organization open to anyone.  One does not have to be a park ranger or an NPS employee to become an ANPR member.  There are networking and informational opportunities within ANPR that can help one be competitive for NPS jobs, and it is important to understand that it is not just what you know, but also who you know that will help one get their foot in the door with the NPS.  ANPR also offers a publication for sale titled, "Live the Adventure: Join the National Park Service" that can be helpful in understanding the requirements for park ranger jobs.  

For more information about ANPR visit their website.

5 years ago
10
Breaks Interstate Park

Breaks Interstate Park is located in the rugged Appalachian Mountains on the border of Virginia and Kentucky on State Route 80. The park is more than 4,600 acres in size, and contains a 5-mile gorge, plunging to 1650 feet, often called the "Grand Canyon of the South." While Virginia ...

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Spring Mountains National Recreation Area

The Spring Mountains National Recreation Area is part of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. Better known to locals as Mount Charleston, it is located just 30 minutes from downtown Las Vegas and encompasses more than 316,000 acres of remarkable beauty and surprising diversity. Enjoy snow-capped mountain peaks that are surrounded by ...

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realrotor
Is there frazle ice at Yosemite right now?
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Mountain Biking, Flora & Fauna, Camping
6 years ago
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Ask_Larso...
69 Answers
12Helpful Answer Rating

Frazil Ice should be forming around this time and continuing through early April. You may try calling the park directly to find out when the icy/water mix begins to accumulate in waterfall-fed streams, but I was not able to reach someone today to check for you directly. The accumulation of Frazil Ice is determined by weather conditions in the park reaching certain temperatures in the daytime, which may not begin for another couple of weeks.

For those of you who are not familiar, the National Park Service and Yosemite Fund (now the Yosemite Conservancy) put together a video on Frazil Ice that you can watch on YouTube.

6 years ago
00
Cherokee Nat'l Forest : Biking the Virginia Creeper Trail Near Cherokee National Forest
Biking the Virginia Cre...
Anne Margaret White
Cherokee Nat'l Forest
Catskill Park

New York's Catskill Mountains include one of the largest and most complex natural areas in the East - on par with the West's Yellowstone National Park. Round, forested mountains; narrow, winding valleys; rushing streams and rivers are features that attract many to the 600,000 acres of the Catskill ...

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Adirondack Park

Encompassing one-third of the total land area of New York State, the Adirondack Park is unique in the United States. Within its boundaries are vast forests and rolling farmlands, towns and villages, mountains and valleys, lakes, ponds and free-flowing rivers, private lands and public forest. The Adirondacks are known for ...

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Jochen Sc...
What is the common relative humidity in the death valley?
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Death Valley National Park, Backpacking, Mountain Biking, Health & Fitness, Safety
7 years ago
1
Answers
samwalsh
40 Answers
5Helpful Answer Rating

Death Valley is generally a dry region with some of the highest temperatures on earth.  Its is below sea level, and the Rocky Mountians block most of the rain fall that could get to it. With the hottest temperatures in the US and the lowest rainfall totals it has to be the least humid place in the US. The nearest lake to death valley is dry as a bone (the dry salt lakes) so with almost no water an the highest temperatures it has to have the lowest humidity.

Check out this map for rainfall totals in the US: http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/maps/current/
Death Valley, all of Nevada, and most of California are in the brown and get the least rainfall in August.
This map shows the rainfall totals for the year:http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/maps/index.php?…

There is an annual flood in Death Valley, but that s a once a year event, if it even comes.

According to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_valle…
"Death Valley is a valley in the U.S. states of California and Nevada, and is the location of the lowest elevation in North America at 282 ft (86 m) below sea level."

"The valley radiates extreme amounts of heat, creating temperatures that are among the hottest on earth. The hottest temperature ever recorded in the United States was 134 °F (56.7 °C) at Furnace Creek on July 10, 1913. The highest average high temperature in July is 117 °F (47 °C) with temperatures of 122 °F (50 °C) or higher being very common. The valley receives less than 2 in (50 mm) of rain annually. The Amargosa River and Furnace Creek flow through the valley, disappearing into the sands of the valley floor.

While Death Valley gets very little rain, it is prone to flooding during heavy rains because the soil is unable to absorb the bulk of the water. The runoff can produce dangerous flash floods. In August 2004, such flooding caused two deaths and shut down the national park."

  

7 years ago
11
crandf
Are there night shuttles to Yellowstone park from Salt lake city?
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Yellowstone National Park, Backpacking, Mountain Biking, Bicycle Touring, Road Biking, Trail Running, Swimming, Guided Tours, Lake Fishing, Ranger-led Programs, Park Passes and Fees
7 years ago
0
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Expert Answer
164 Answers
26Helpful Answer Rating

Most of the bus services we're familiar with leave SLC in the morning - around 10am.  You might be able to get a private trip to leave later in the day, depending on how many are in your party.

Here are a few links to check out and perhaps worth a call to check on your exact dates:
 

http://www.bundubus.com/grand_canyon_transportation_schedule.php
http://www.yellowstonenationalparktours.com/yellowstone_tours.htm

7 years ago
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