Mountaineering

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Capitol Reef, Waterpocket Fold, Land of the Sleeping Rainbow—all are colorful names to describe a park with many striking characteristics.

Waterpocket Fold, the main feature of the park, is the name of a 100-mile-long fold in the earth's surface. This uplift contains innumerable eroded basins or pockets that hold thousands of gallons of rainwater. These pockets of water have affected the history of humanity within the park and the flora and fauna of the region.

Entering the park from the west gives the most impressive view of the 1,000-foot-high stone barrier into which erosive forces have sculpted fascinating canyons, mesas, buttes and mazes. Once in the park, other astonishing panoramas await you.

Within a short distance of the visitor center, you will see Capitol Dome, Chimney Rock, the Goosenecks and the Egyptian Temple. Hickman Bridge, the Golden Throne and Capitol Gorge reward you after easy to moderate hikes. Prehistoric petroglyphs, the Fruita Schoolhouse, the Gifford Farmhouse and the Behunin Cabin speak of bygone eras and can be reached by car. The 20-mile round-trip Scenic Drive will take you past the Ripple Rock Nature Center and many of the park's features.

If you are seeking a remote wilderness experience, Capitol Reef has it. To the north of Route 24, dirt roads, which generally require high-clearance or 4-wheel-drive vehicles, lead into the park's north end through the heart of Cathedral Valley, an area of monolithic formations of Entrada and Curtis sandstones, some of which are 500 feet high. South of Route 24, graded roads, usually suitable for high-clearance vehicles, lead into some very fine hiking country. Besides good hiking opportunities, the southern part of the park also offers spectacular views of the folded strata of Capitol Reef and the Henry Mountains. Muley Twist Canyon is in the southern end of the park, as is Brimhall Bridge. Check with a park ranger before setting out for any of these more remote locations. Weather conditions may make the roads slick and impassable.

8 years ago
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Virginia ...
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I made a custom essay and I found that it is located on the Waterpocket Fold in central Utah, Capitol Reef National Park offers rugged, beautiful scenery with deep and narrow canyons, spectacular vistas, great expanses of slickrock and multi-colored rock layers exposed by the massive fold in the earth's crust. Petroglyphs give evidence of the early inhabitants of the area dating back at least 10,000 years. The area also has a more recent history in evidence with the orchards and buildings from the Fruita community that was founded by Mormon pioneers in 1880.
8 years ago
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usdelac
As a school department is there any way we can get some complimentary park guides to give students ideas on where to go for adventure?
This question relates to the items listed below. Click each link for more information
California, Backpacking, Canoeing, Cross-country Skiing, Bicycle Touring, Downhill Skiing, Kayaking, Snorkeling, Trail Running, Eco Tours, Mountaineering, Rock Climbing, Snowboarding, Surfing, Snowshoeing, Historic Sites, Caving, Camping
8 years ago
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a_dansie
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Use the contact info on this page. American Park Network (this organization) publishes the "green guides" that the parks hand out. They will send them to you free.
8 years ago
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Cooper
12 Answers

On the bottom of every page on OhRanger.com there is a square box that offers a link to ordering guides.  The guides are not 100% free, but they are offered for less than $1/piece to cover handling.

If you want to find out where the guides are locally, you can send an email to distribution@americanparknetwork.com


Here's the link just in case:

http://www.altrec.com/american-park-network/national-park-guide-set/?american=1&market=1&cm_mmc_o=4z...

8 years ago
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Mt. Adams Wilderness

Along the west slope of Mt. Adams lies the 46,353-acre Mt. Adams Wilderness. The 12,326-foot high Mt. Adams is the second highest peak in the Northwest after Mt. Rainier. Mt. Adams Wilderness is bounded on the east by the Yakima Indian Reservation. Wilderness trails offer the hiker spectacular views ...

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Park Love...
Where is the major trail head at the foot of Mt. Olympus near Salt Lake City Utah?
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Wasatch Mountain State Park, Utah, Bird Watching, Mountaineering, Mountain Lions, Wildflowers, Wolves
8 years ago
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The trailhead is located east of Salt Lake City on Wasatch Boulevard. If you are traveling north on I-215, take the 3900 South exit to Wasatch Boulevard, then turn south and drive for 2.3 miles. If you are driving south on I-215, take the 4500 South exit to Wasatch Boulevard, than continue south for 1.6 miles. There is a paved parking lot on the east side of Wasatch Boulevard, which is marked the "Mt. Olympus Trailhead.” The trail climbs 4,200 feet over 3.5 miles from the trailhead at 5800 S. and Wasatch Blvd. Mount Olympus offers many challenging routes and we hope you’ll share your experiences with everyone at OhRanger.com.
8 years ago
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Mountaineering

Combine climbing ethics, high altitudes, physical strength and self-suffiency as you mountaineer your way to the top of America's National Parks! World class mountaineering opportunities abound the National Park System, especially the glacier strewn landscape of Alaska's most treasured peaks. Climbers from all over the globe test their survival skills from the highest peaks, vertical rock walls and ice shields that adorn America's public lands.

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Yosemite National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Michael Tollefson
Yosemite National Park, one of the first national parks in the United States, is best known for its waterfalls and impressive granite walls. Within its nearly 1,200 square miles, you can also find deep valleys, sprawling meadows, ancient giant sequoias, a vast wilderness area, and the grandeur of the Sierra Nevada John Muir describes as "the heart of the world".
Park Acreage: 
747956
Highest Point: 
Mount Lyell
Highest Point Elevation: 
13114 feet
Visitor Count: 
3242644
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
Yes
Park Sights: 
Yosemite Valley; Bridalveil Fall; Yosemite Falls; El Capitan; Half Dome; Happy Isles; Mirror Lake; Mirror Meadow; Valley View Turnout; Tunnel View; Wawona; Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias; Glacier Point; Badger Pass Ski Area; Hetch Hetchy; Tioga Road; High Country; Olmsted Point; Tenaya Lake; Tuolomne Meadows
Endangered Species: 
Red-legged Frogs (threatened); Foothill Yellow-legged Frogs (threatened); Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep (threatened); Limestone Salamander (threatened); Giant Garter Snake (threatened); Great Gray Owl; Willow Flycatcher; Sierra Nevada Red Fox (threatened); California Wolverine (threatened); Thompson's Sedge; Yosemite Onion; Congdon's Lewisia; Congdon's Woolly Sunflower; Peregrine Falcon; Southern Bald Eagle; Yosemite Woolly Sunflower (threatened); Congdon's Lewisia (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Individual Pass: $10 (on foot, horseback, motorcycle); Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $20; Commercial Tour Fees: $25-300 (varies depending on seating capacity); Yosemite Annual Pass: $40
Nearest Major City: 
Mariposa, CA
Gateway Communities: 
Fish Camp, CA; El Portal, CA; Mather, CA; Lee Vining; Oakhurst, CA; Bass Lake, CA; Wishon, CA; Ahwahnee, CA; Midpines, CA; Coarsegold, CA; Groveland, CA; Big Oak Flat, CA; Mariposa, CA; Auberry, CA; Soulsbyville, CA; Twain Harte, CA; Hayward, CA; Strawberry, CA
Nearby Airports: 
Fresno-Yosemite International (FAT); Merced Airport (MCE); Modesto City-County Airport (MOD); San Francisco International Airport (SFO); Oakland International Airport (OAK); San Jose International Airport (SJC); Sacramento International Airport (SMF); Reno/Tahoe International Airport (RNO)

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Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Superintendent Name: 
Meg Jensen

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park is the point where the Chugach, Wrangell and St. Elias mountain ranges all converge in what is often referred to as the "mountain kingdom of North America." This is the largest unit of the National Park System. The park includes the continent's largest assemblage of glaciers and the greatest collection of peaks above 16,000 feet.

Park Open Info: 
Year-round (many park facilities close during the winter season)
Park Closed Info: 
Year-round (many park facilities close during the winter season)
Park Acreage: 
1.31881
Highest Point: 
Mount Saint Elias
Highest Point Elevation: 
18008 feet
Visitor Count: 
50336
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Mount St. Elias; Kennecott; Chitina; Liberty Falls Trail; Nabesna; McCarthy Road; Root Glacier Trail
Endangered Species: 
Grizzly Bear; Lynx; Stellar Sea-lion (threatened); Kittlitz's Murrelets (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Anchorage, AK
Gateway Communities: 
McCarthy, AK; Nabesna, AK; Slana, AK; Galkana, AK; Chitina, AK; Glennallen, AK; Tok, AK; Valdez, AK; Cordova, AK
Nearby Airports: 
Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Vaughn Baker
This "park in the sky," which captures the full grandeur of the Rocky Mountains, is one of our country's most frequently visited national parks, attracting more than three million visitors each year. 76 of the great mountains in the park reach elevations of 12,000 feet or more. Forests of spruce and fir tower over wide valleys where aspen and willow line hundreds of streams and lakes. At the highest elevations, above the tree line, is the fascinating, arctic-like alpine tundra, fraught with blizzards in winter and filled with flowered meadows in summer.
Park Acreage: 
265828
Highest Point: 
Longs Peak
Highest Point Elevation: 
14255 feet
Visitor Count: 
2743676
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
Yes
Park Sights: 
Stanley Hotel; Grand Lake; Rocky Mountains; Trail Ridge Road; Old Fall River Road; Lawn Lake; Fall River Area
Endangered Species: 
Boreal Toad (threatened); Bald Eagle (threatened); Least Tern; Mexican Spotted Owl (threatened); Piping Plover (threatened); Whooping Crane; Yellow-billed Cuckoo (threatened); Bonytail; Colorado Pikeminnow; Greenback Cutthroat Trout (threatened); Humpback Chub; Pallid Sturgeon (threatened); Razorback Sucker; Canada Lynx (threatened); Preble's Meadow Jumping Mouse (threatened)
Entrance Fees: 
Individual Pass (valid for 7 days): $10; Vehicle Pass (valid for 7 days): $20; Commercial Tour Fees: $25-$200 (varies depending on seating capacity); Annual Park Pass: $35
Nearest Major City: 
Estes Park, CO
Gateway Communities: 
Estes Park, CO; Grand Lake, CO; Glen Haven, CO; Drake, CO; Allenspark, CO; Granby, CO; Lyons, CO; Hot Sulphur Springs, CO; Tabernash, CO; Hygiene, CO; Ward, CO; Masonville, CO; Parshall, CO; Loveland, CO; Fraser, CO; Winter Park, CO; Longmont, CO
Nearby Airports: 
Denver International Airport (DIA)

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Kobuk Valley National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Vacant

Sand dunes, the Kobuk River, Onion Portage, and the Baird Mountains are just some of the facets of Kobuk Valley National Park. Half a million caribou migrate through, their tracks crisscrossing the sand-sculpted dunes. The Kobuk River is an ancient and current path for people and wildlife. For 9,000 years, people came to Onion Portage to harvest caribou as they swam the river. Even today, that rich tradition continues.

Park Acreage: 
1.75042
Highest Point: 
Mount Angayukaqsraq
Highest Point Elevation: 
4750 feet
Visitor Count: 
3005
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Baird Mountains; Kobuk River
Endangered Species: 
Grizzly Bear; Common Loon
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Fairbanks, AK
Gateway Communities: 
Ambler, AK
Nearby Airports: 
Fairbanks International Airport (FAI); Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)

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Kenai Fjords National Park

Superintendent Name: 
Jeff Mow
Kenai Fjords national Park is a dramatic glacial landscape of ice, tidewater glaciers, deeply chiseled fjords and jagged peninsulas - 607,805 acres of unspoiled wilderness on the southeast coast of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. The park is capped by the Harding Icefield, a relic from past ice-ages and the largest icefield entirely within U.S. borders. At Kenai, visitors can witness a landscape continuously shaped by glaciers, earthquakes and storms.
Park Open Info: 
Year-round; Kenai Fjords Information Center opens May 21; Exit Glacier Nature Center opens May 21
Park Closed Info: 
Year-round; Kenai Fjords Information Center closes September 29; Exit Glacier Nature Center closes September 29
Park Acreage: 
669541
Highest Point: 
McCarty Peak
Highest Point Elevation: 
6450 feet
Visitor Count: 
251630
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Harding Icefield; Kenai Lake Road; Moose Pass; Exit Glacier; Chiswell Islands
Endangered Species: 
Bald Eagle (threatened); Grizzly Bear; Humpback Whale
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Seward, AK
Gateway Communities: 
Seward, AK; Moose Pass, AK; Cooper Landing, AK
Nearby Airports: 
Kenai Municipal Airport (ENA); Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)

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