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Capitol Reef, Waterpocket Fold, Land of the Sleeping Rainbow—all are colorful names to describe a park with many striking characteristics.

Waterpocket Fold, the main feature of the park, is the name of a 100-mile-long fold in the earth's surface. This uplift contains innumerable eroded basins or pockets that hold thousands of gallons of rainwater. These pockets of water have affected the history of humanity within the park and the flora and fauna of the region.

Entering the park from the west gives the most impressive view of the 1,000-foot-high stone barrier into which erosive forces have sculpted fascinating canyons, mesas, buttes and mazes. Once in the park, other astonishing panoramas await you.

Within a short distance of the visitor center, you will see Capitol Dome, Chimney Rock, the Goosenecks and the Egyptian Temple. Hickman Bridge, the Golden Throne and Capitol Gorge reward you after easy to moderate hikes. Prehistoric petroglyphs, the Fruita Schoolhouse, the Gifford Farmhouse and the Behunin Cabin speak of bygone eras and can be reached by car. The 20-mile round-trip Scenic Drive will take you past the Ripple Rock Nature Center and many of the park's features.

If you are seeking a remote wilderness experience, Capitol Reef has it. To the north of Route 24, dirt roads, which generally require high-clearance or 4-wheel-drive vehicles, lead into the park's north end through the heart of Cathedral Valley, an area of monolithic formations of Entrada and Curtis sandstones, some of which are 500 feet high. South of Route 24, graded roads, usually suitable for high-clearance vehicles, lead into some very fine hiking country. Besides good hiking opportunities, the southern part of the park also offers spectacular views of the folded strata of Capitol Reef and the Henry Mountains. Muley Twist Canyon is in the southern end of the park, as is Brimhall Bridge. Check with a park ranger before setting out for any of these more remote locations. Weather conditions may make the roads slick and impassable.

7 years ago
01
Virginia ...
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I made a custom essay and I found that it is located on the Waterpocket Fold in central Utah, Capitol Reef National Park offers rugged, beautiful scenery with deep and narrow canyons, spectacular vistas, great expanses of slickrock and multi-colored rock layers exposed by the massive fold in the earth's crust. Petroglyphs give evidence of the early inhabitants of the area dating back at least 10,000 years. The area also has a more recent history in evidence with the orchards and buildings from the Fruita community that was founded by Mormon pioneers in 1880.
7 years ago
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Winter schedule set for Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park

November 6, 2009, 7:22 am
Hurricane Ridge, high in the mountains above Port Angeles, Wash., will be open Friday through Sunday this winter, plus school holidays, for winter recreation.Here are the details about the Hurricane Ridge winter season.Hurricane Ridge RoadBarring heavy snows or winter storms, the Hurricane Ridge Road is scheduledto be open 9 a.m. to ...

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What Month is a good time to go to Crater Lake Lodge? Is there a chater bus or van that goes to Crater Lake Lodge? Brisadaum@yahoo.com
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Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, ATVs, Backpacking, Dog Mushing, Kayaking, Snorkeling, Ice Skating, Swimming, Lake Fishing, Surfing, Snowmobiling, Water Skiing, Sailing, Snowshoeing, Caving, Camping, Lodging, Horseback Riding, Touring
8 years ago
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While Crater Lake National Park is open year-round, the Lodge itself is only open from the end of May typically (it is scheduled to open 5/26 in 2010) through mid-October.  The lodge is closed for this season 

Crater Lake receives A LOT of snow up into the spring season and starting again in early fall.  So, if your vehicle is prepared for it, snowy months can be beautiful times to explore the park.  Just make sure to check ahead that the roads have been plowed.  The "Rim Road" is usually in pretty good shape for most of the year.

There is no van or shuttle directly to the lodge.  For reservations or more information call Xanterra at (888) 774-2728.

 Have a great trip!

 


8 years ago
00
usdelac
As a school department is there any way we can get some complimentary park guides to give students ideas on where to go for adventure?
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California, Backpacking, Canoeing, Cross-country Skiing, Bicycle Touring, Downhill Skiing, Kayaking, Snorkeling, Trail Running, Eco Tours, Mountaineering, Rock Climbing, Snowboarding, Surfing, Snowshoeing, Historic Sites, Caving, Camping
8 years ago
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a_dansie
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Use the contact info on this page. American Park Network (this organization) publishes the "green guides" that the parks hand out. They will send them to you free.
8 years ago
10
Cooper
12 Answers

On the bottom of every page on OhRanger.com there is a square box that offers a link to ordering guides.  The guides are not 100% free, but they are offered for less than $1/piece to cover handling.

If you want to find out where the guides are locally, you can send an email to distribution@americanparknetwork.com


Here's the link just in case:

http://www.altrec.com/american-park-network/national-park-guide-set/?american=1&market=1&cm_mmc_o=4z...

8 years ago
00
ldysrvyr
We are off to RMNP for the thanksgiving holiday. we want to camp/backpack, bag a few peaks..we know it will be cold and snow..any tips ?
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Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, Snowshoeing, Camping, Winter Sports
8 years ago
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Rocky Mountain National Park is quite beautiful in the fall and winter.  It's hard to predict the weather, though snow is certainly a possibility. If there is snow on the ground, the park has a reflective appeal that really brings the mountains to the forefront.  If there's no snow, the fallen Aspen leaves will dot the soft ground in an "otherworldly" mix of orange and yellow hues.

Longs Peak, Aspenglen and Timber Crook campgrounds are the only in-park campgrounds open all year.  Note that once the snows begin, Longs Peak and Timber Crook are not plowed, so you'll have to carry supplies to your campsite... None of these campgrounds has water in winter. 

If you we going into the Park backcountry overnight, you will need a special permit, available free at park headquarters, or the Kawuneeche Visitor Center.  Surely the park will tell you the same, but please note that temps will most certainly be cold, so please pack enough warm clothing and appropriate sleep gear, and be aware of Hypothermia if you are planning to spend significant time outdoors.
8 years ago
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Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

Superintendent Name: 
Vaughn Baker

For over 9,000 years people have been coming to the powerful Columbia River of Lake Roosevelt National Monument. Once upon a time, the rich fishery of the river was used for survival and prosperity, and today visitors continue to enjoy the river’s recreational opportunities of fishing, camping, hunting and boating. Experience life on the river past and present when you visit Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

Park Acreage: 
100390
Visitor Count: 
1281586
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
Yes
Park Sights: 
Fort Spokane; Kettle Falls; Columbia Basin; Cascade Mountains
Endangered Species: 
Bald Eagle; Bull Trout; California Bighorn Sheep; American Peregrine
Entrance Fees: 
Campsite: $10.00 per night per site (May 1–September 30),
Nearest Major City: 
Spokane, WA
Gateway Communities: 
Coulee Dam, WA; Elmer City, WA; Grand Coulee, WA; Electric City, WA; Nespelem, WA
Nearby Airports: 
Spokane International Airport (GEG)

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Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

Superintendent Name: 
JoAnne Kyral

Native Americans utilized the Mississippi River for trade, food and water supply long before Europeans visited the “New World.” Its watersheds have shaped the continent and its cultures, and today the “Father of Waters” is still just as powerful as it once was. Millions of people get their drinking water from the watershed, and also use it as a playground, a shipping lane, and a political boundary. Millions of plants, animals and other living things thrive in the river’s ecosystem.

Park Open Info: 
Year-round (Monday-Saturday)
Park Closed Info: 
Year-round (Monday-Saturday)
Park Acreage: 
53775
Highest Point Elevation: 
1000 feet
Visitor Count: 
3000000
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Mississippi River; Saint Anthony Falls
Endangered Species: 
Higgins Eye Pearlymussel
Entrance Fees: 
Free
Nearest Major City: 
Minneapolis, MN
Gateway Communities: 
Davenport, IA; Rock Island, IL; Bettendorf, IA; Milan, IL; Moline, IL
Nearby Airports: 
Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport (MSP)

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Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

Superintendent Name: 
Darrell J. Cook
Welcome to the relaxing surroundings of Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, bursting with forests, mountains, upland prairie, deep canyons, broad valleys, high desert, lake and wetlands. The Canyon was established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, following the construction of the Yellowtail Dam by the Bureau of Reclamation. Since its establishment, people have been able to find tranquil settings to better explore recreation, nature, wildlife and history.
Park Open Info: 
Memorial Day
Park Closed Info: 
Labor Day
Park Acreage: 
68490
Highest Point: 
Pryor Mountains
Highest Point Elevation: 
8822 feet
Visitor Count: 
177414
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Yellowtail Dam; Bighorn River; Bighorn Lake
Endangered Species: 
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep; American Peregrine Falcon; Townsend's Big-eared Bat; Northern Leopard Frog
Entrance Fees: 
Vehicle: $5.00; Annual: $30.00; Commercial Tours: 1–6 passenger - $25.00, 7-25 passenger - $40.00, 26+passenger - $100.00
Nearest Major City: 
Billings, MT
Gateway Communities: 
Saint Xavier, MT
Nearby Airports: 
Billings Logan International Airport (BIL)

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Curecanti National Recreation Area

Superintendent Name: 
Connie Rudd
Curecanti National Recreation Area encompasses three reservoirs, which form the heart of the park. Colorado's largest body of water, Blue Mesa Reservoir, is the largest Kokanee Salmon fishery in the U.S. Morrow Point Reservoir is the beginning of the Black Canyon, and below, East Portal is the site of the Gunnison Diversion Tunnel, a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. Panoramic mesas, fjord-like reservoirs, and deep, steep and narrow canyons abound.
Park Acreage: 
41972
Highest Point: 
Blue Mesa Lake
Highest Point Elevation: 
7519 feet
Visitor Count: 
936380
Visitor Count Year Recorded: 
2006
Has Volunteer Program: 
Yes
Has Recycling: 
Yes
Has Shuttle System: 
No
Park Sights: 
Denver Railroad; Rio Grande Western Railroad; Blue Mesa; Morrow Point Reservoir; Crystal Reservoir
Endangered Species: 
Great Blue Heron; Gunnison Sage Grouse
Entrance Fees: 
Free; East Portal Entrance Fee: $15 per vehicle
Nearest Major City: 
Montrose, CO
Gateway Communities: 
Cimarron, CO; Gunnison, CO
Nearby Airports: 
Montrose Regional Airport (MTJ)

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