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JLJudy
How much should we be concerned about mountain lions when hiking in and around the cascade mountains?
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Bumping Lake, Washington, Backpacking, Bears, Mountain Lions, Camping, Hiking, Safety
9 years ago
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85 Answers
31Helpful Answer Rating

Mountain lions, known is the Pacific Northwest as cougars, live in the Cascade Mountains. Since they are mainly nocturnal creatures and are rarely seen, they're sometimes called "ghost walker" and "ghost of the wilderness." Cougars favor dense forests that provide good stalking cover while hunting. They also take advantage of steep canyons and rock outcroppings to remain hidden.

If you visit the backcountry, you are in cougar habitat, in their territory. Keep this in mind and follow some basic rules. Cougars are shy, secretive cats and typically avoid contact with people. Few people ever see this elusive cat in the wild, but sightings and encounters have increased in recent years.

For your safety:

  • Never approach a cougar, especially a feeding one. Cats are unpredictable, but will normally avoid a confrontation -- give them a way out. In areas of known cougar sightings, do not hike alone.

  • Keep children close to you when hiking and pick them up if you see fresh signs of a cougar.

If you encounter a cougar:

  • Do not run. Avert your gaze and speak to it in a calm voice. Do not turn your back on the cougar. Hold your ground or back away slowly. Sudden movement or flight may trigger an instinctive attack.

  • Spread your arms, open your coat -- do all you can to enlarge your image.

If the cougar act aggressively:

  • Wave your arms, shout, and throw rocks or sticks. If you are attacked, fight back. Do not "play dead."

 

Reporting an Encounter

If by some rare chance, you meet the ghost cat of the Cascades, consider it a gift. Please make a report at any ranger station or park facility.

9 years ago
00
beverlywh...
For moderate hiking what is the best ranger hike at yellowstone for both animal viewing and scenery?
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Bears, Trail Running, Wildlife Watching, Geology, Wildflowers, Volcanology
9 years ago
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Rich
2 Answers
8Helpful Answer Rating

Im not that familiar with the actual Ranger led hikes, since I tend to set out on my own or with a fellow employee or two.

I recommend the Total Yellowstone Page's hiking section:

http://www.yellowstone-natl-park.com/hiking.htm

Hikes are broken down into Day Hikes and Longer Hikes, and descriptions are given for most of the trails.

Also, stop in the visitor center at the location you're based at (Canyon, Old Faithful and Mammoth have the best centers) and see what the Rangers themselves have to say.

9 years ago
00
acreswick
Hows the wildlife viewing-bears,wolves,elk,and wildflowers in the last 2 weeks of july
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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Bears, Wildlife Watching, Elk, Moose, Mountain Lions, Wildflowers, Wolves, Hiking
9 years ago
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26 Answers
6Helpful Answer Rating

Wildlife viewing depends more upon location and time of day in July. The Lamar Valley area in the remote northeast corner of the park is the best place to see wildlife including bears and wolves. Because of the warm temperatures, the best time to view wildlife throughout the park is early morning and at dusk. Visitors in late July can still see wildflowers in bloom but the park's peak time for wildflowers occurs in spring during May and June.

9 years ago
00
acreswick
In the last 2 weeks in july,will you be able to view bears,wolves,elk,also will wildflowers be in bloom
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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Bears, Wildlife Watching, Bird Watching, Elk, Moose, Flora & Fauna, Mountain Lions, Wildflowers, Wolves, Hiking, Photography
9 years ago
3
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Rich
2 Answers
8Helpful Answer Rating

Wildflowers, definitely. There's a ton of different colors to see in the park that time of year. Elk should be easy to spot around Mammoth Hot Springs. Bear and Wolves are elusive, but they're around, with a little luck and a good eye you could spot them. Or, if you're not lucky, there's the Bear and Wolf center in West Yellowstone where you can see them in a mini zoo type setting.

9 years ago
10
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