Gear

Reuben
In Glacier NP, where can I buy gas for my camp stove, and what are their hours of operation?
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Glacier National Park, Backpacking, Gear
8 years ago
3
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Expert Answer
Ask_Elif
53 Answers
5Helpful Answer Rating
You can by supplies such as food, firewood, fuel, camping gear and first-aid kits at camp stores in Apgar, Lake McDonald, Two Medicine, Rising Sun and Swiftcurrent. Stores in Waterton Townsite and the gateway communities of Babb, Browining, St. Mary, East Glacier, West Glacier and Polebridge also carry supplies.

Here a few of the supply stores where you can buy gas for your campstove:

Glacier Outdoor Center
#6 Going to the Sun Road and Hwy 2
PGlacier, MT 59936
TOLLFREE: 1-800-235-6781
Hours: 7:30am-9pm 7 days a week

Snappy Sports Center
1400 Hwy 2 E - Kalispell, MT 59901
Phone: 406-257-7525 or Toll Free at 888-960-1234
E-mail: [email protected]
Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-9pm; Sat 8am-7pm; Sun 9am-6pm

Sportsman & Ski Haus
145 Hutton Ranch Rd.
Kalispell, Mt. 59901
PHONE: (406) 755-6484
Hours: Monday-Saturday 9am-9pm, Sunday 10am-6pm

Sportsman & Ski Haus
Mountain Mall
Whitefish, Mt. 59937
PHONE: (406) 862-3111
Regular Hours: Monday-Saturday 9am-8pm, Sunday 10am-4pm Ski Season Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am-8pm, Sunday 8am-6pm

Thanks for stopping by OhRanger.com!
8 years ago
10
Park Love...
What kind of insects are in Glacier national park?
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Glacier National Park, Gear, Camping, Safety
8 years ago
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Expert Answer
164 Answers
26Helpful Answer Rating
Good question. Please see this article from the National Park Service, www.nps.gov/glac "It would be nearly impossible to compile a complete list of arthropods (insects, spiders, etc.) for any one area of the world. There are simply too many. Glacier National Park is no exception. Every year scientists discover new species of insects, mites or spiders. Experts say there may be 5 million species worldwide -- most still unidentified. There are many strange and interesting arthropods in the park. For an education on insect diversity, examine any large rotting log in the west-side ancient forest. Centipedes, millipedes, sowbugs, mites, beetles, spiders -- in some logs, 20,000 species -- go about their work turning a dead tree into soil. Here, life is dedicated to recycling dead matter into nutrients that will nurture new life. The prairies to the east of the park are hot in the summer. To escape the heat, millions of army cutworm moths migrate to high, cool alpine areas in the mountains of Glacier Park and roost under the loose rocks of talus slopes. Grizzly bears turn these over and feast on the moths for a few weeks during late summer. Ladybird beetles also congregate in certain alpine areas and grizzlies, always hungry, also know about this natural gathering. In five areas of the park (at last count), small colonies of 10 to 30 Yellowstone checkerspot butterflies live. They lay their eggs only on black bearberry leaves in sunny, wet spots. The black bearberry is an early-stage successional plant -- it grows just after the pioneer species take root following a fire. The combination of dependency on wildfire and utilization of a specific plant for reproduction makes life precarious for checkerspots. But they are here. Natural systems comprise a complex mix of species, habitats and the nuances of inanimate and environmental factors. The magic of Glacier Park is that we can observe life in a truly wild and intact system. The recent discovery of 80 or more species of organisms living deep below some river floodplains is another interesting story. Twenty feet deep in the gravels of these dry riverbeds, an entire system exists beginning with various species of algae and culminating in large predatory stoneflies at the top of the food chain. This system fertilizes springs and upwellings in adjacent wetlands making them more fertile and enabling hungry grizzlies to eat well early in the spring when they need the food most. This vast system was discovered about ten years ago along the western boundary of Glacier Park. Since then it's been discovered that many rivers and creeks overlay such a system. How many other stories like this await discovery?" Happy hunting! And make sure to check back with us at OhRanger.com if you have any more questions along the way.
8 years ago
00
Park Love...
What are our chances of getting into the park on the 30th of June? Want to tent camp, hike.
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Yosemite National Park, California, Backpacking, Gear, Geology, Photography
8 years ago
2
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48 Answers
3Helpful Answer Rating
You'll have no problem getting into the park and hike to your heart's content. If you want to camp in the backcountry, though, you'll need to obtain a FREE wilderness permits that is available both via reservation and on a first-come, first-serve basis. Yosemite National Park has a trailhead quota system limiting the number of people entering a particular trailhead on a given day. This system is designed to reduce impacts and to avoid overcrowding, in keeping with the Wilderness Act's mandate of providing "outstanding opportunities for solitude." Of each daily quota for a trailhead, 60 percent can be reserved ahead of time while the remaining 40 percent is available on a first-come, first-served basis one day prior to, or the same day as, the beginning of your hike. The quota system is based on where you begin your hike, and in some cases, on where you camp the first night of your trip. After the first night, you may hike to another section of the Wilderness without restriction. For this reason, even if you have a permit lasting for several days, you may not begin your trip on any day except the first day your permit is valid. First-Come, First-Served Permits Permits are also available at any permit issuing station starting one day prior to the beginning of your hike. All wilderness permits must be picked up in person by a member of the hiking group. Priority for permits for a particular trailhead is given to the closest permit issuing station, though it is possible to obtain a permit for any trailhead at any permit issuing station. This mainly affects the most popular trailheads that fill up quickly each morning, such as Little Yosemite Valley trailheads, Lyell Canyon, Cathedral Lakes, among others. Wilderness Permit Reservations Wilderness permit reservations are available up to 24 weeks (168 days) in advance when the wilderness permit reservation office is open (early January through October). Reservations are not available two or fewer days in advance (see below for information about first-come, first-served permits). (View a table showing when you can make a reservation for a specific day.) The cost for each confirmed reservation is $5 plus $5 per person. This fee is non-refundable and non-transferable. Even with a reservation, you, or another member of your hiking group, must pick up the wilderness permit at any permit station during business hours the day of, or the day before, your hike. Reserved permits are held until 10 am on the day of your trip. If you will arrive later than 10 am on the day of your trip, please call us to hold your permit for a late arrival: 209/372-0308 (this number is for cancellations only) . Otherwise, your permit reservation will be canceled. Permits held for late arrival still must be picked up at a permit station during business hours. (You can check current hours for permit stations at the bottom of the wilderness conditions update.) Please plan your trip before you make a reservation. It is your responsibility to research trails and trail conditions to decide which trip is right for you and your group. Park rangers will not plan your trip for you. Before making a reservation, check availability. If the date or trailhead isn't listed, space is available for at least one person (but not necessarily for your entire group). To make a reservation please have the name the permit will be under, mailing address, daytime telephone number, number of people, number of stock animals (horses, mules, llamas), start and end dates, beginning and ending trailheads, principal destination (to help clarify trailhead), method of payment ($5 plus $5/person): credit card, check, or money order. Three Ways to Make a Reservation The reservation office is open January through October and accepts reservations for trips during May through September. Reservations are not necessary for trips during November through April. The park is not accepting reservations via the Internet in 2009. * Fax (preferred): Please complete a reservation form on your computer, then print and fax it to 209/372-0739. Allow two weeks to receive a printed confirmation by mail. If you provide an email address, you will receive a generic confirmation within one business day stating whether you received your first, second, or third choice. If you would like to request a reservation for a departure date within the next two weeks, please apply by phone. * Phone: Please have your trip planned and the above information ready before calling 209/372-0740. The phone is staffed Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Extended hours are in effect from May 25 to September 7, 2009: Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm, Saturday, 9 am to 4 pm; Sunday, 9 am to 12 pm. * Mail: Please complete and print the reservation form, or send a letter with the information requested above, along with payment, to Wilderness Permits, PO Box 545, Yosemite, CA, 95389. Make checks and money orders payable to "Yosemite Association." All major credit cards are accepted. Do not send cash. Please allow two weeks to receive a response. Only apply once for each request: If you apply twice for the same request, you will be charged a non-refundable, non-transferable processing fee for both reservations. Reservation changes: If space is available within the same season, you can request a change to your existing reservation's date or trailhead for no additional charge. If you have questions regarding your reservation, or would like to make changes to an existing reservation, please do so only by calling (209) 372-0740. We are unable to correspond by email or fax. Processing fees are non-refundable and non-transferable. Though popular trailheads may fill up, there is generally space available on other trailheads in the park. From November through April, permits are available without a reservation. Backpackers' Campgrounds Wilderness permit holders may spend one night prior to, and one night after, a backpacking trip in a backpackers' campground (summer only). This service is especially helpful for those wishing to get a first-come, first-served permit the day before beginning the hike. For more information and to download a reservation form, visit http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/wildpermits.htm
8 years ago
00
Park Love...
We will be at Bonanza Creek Campground near Challis, ID July 6-10. What are some good trails to hike and other activities to do nearby?
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Archaeology, Auto/Motorcycle, Astronomy/Stargazing, Swimming, Fossils, Lake Fishing, Gear, Ranger-led Programs, River Rafting, Health & Fitness, Wildflowers, History/Culture, Hiking, Kids Activities, Safety, Volcanology, Picnicking
8 years ago
0
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Expert Answer
48 Answers
3Helpful Answer Rating
If you enjoy scenic beauty, extended hikes, short day hikes, and the serenity of escaping from the crowds, then you'll love the area around Bonanza Creek Campground in Challis Salmon National Forest. The campground is located in the Yankee Fork Ranger District offers over 300 miles of trails to enjoy. There are trails that will take you into a mixture of rugged peaks, timbered slopes, narrow canyon bottoms and majestic lakes. The Yankee Fork District offers a vast variety of trails to satisfy the desires of all kinds of uses, motorcycles, four wheelers, horseback, bicyclers and hikers, whether they are a novice or experienced. You can find a lot more information about the area here: http://www.fs.fed.us/r4/sc/yankeefork/trails.shtml have a great trip!
8 years ago
00
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