Geology

Park Love...
Will the free shuttle in Yosemite take you to most of the interesting places? Can you get off the shuttle and back on?
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Yosemite National Park, Guided Tours, Geology, Flora & Fauna
10 years ago
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Yes, the Yosemite Valley Shuttle bus stops at all overnight accommodations, stores and major sites of interest. You are allowed to get on and off at whichever stop you please. In the summer the buses run every 10-20 minutes. During other seasons it runs every 30 minutes. There is also a second shuttle bus that stops at El Capitan, Four Mile trailhead and the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center. Visit http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/bus.htm for more information as well as a schedule and map of the bus route. Enjoy your trip!
10 years ago
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Park Love...
Where in northern Utah or Wyoming can a family go "panning for gold"?
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Utah, Wyoming, Geology, Regional Activities
10 years ago
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American Forks Canyon in Alpine is the only recreational mining spot in Utah. The best location is above the Tibble Reservoir. To get there you take the Alpine Scenic Loop up the canyon and past Timpanogas cave. East of the cave you will find a fork in the road and turn left towards Tibble Reservoir. In Wyoming there are several mining locations the best among them is in the Douglas Creek area in Albany County. We’ve provided you with the southern counties and available links to their chambers of commerce. In southeast Wyoming there is Carbon, Goshen and Laramie. In southwest Wyoming you can go to Lincoln County. Also check out these two links about gold panning in Utah and Wyoming http://www.goldfeverprospecting.com/wygopaprin.html and http://miningold.com/states/ut.html
10 years ago
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Park Love...
What are our chances of getting into the park on the 30th of June? Want to tent camp, hike.
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Yosemite National Park, California, Backpacking, Gear, Geology, Photography
10 years ago
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You'll have no problem getting into the park and hike to your heart's content. If you want to camp in the backcountry, though, you'll need to obtain a FREE wilderness permits that is available both via reservation and on a first-come, first-serve basis. Yosemite National Park has a trailhead quota system limiting the number of people entering a particular trailhead on a given day. This system is designed to reduce impacts and to avoid overcrowding, in keeping with the Wilderness Act's mandate of providing "outstanding opportunities for solitude." Of each daily quota for a trailhead, 60 percent can be reserved ahead of time while the remaining 40 percent is available on a first-come, first-served basis one day prior to, or the same day as, the beginning of your hike. The quota system is based on where you begin your hike, and in some cases, on where you camp the first night of your trip. After the first night, you may hike to another section of the Wilderness without restriction. For this reason, even if you have a permit lasting for several days, you may not begin your trip on any day except the first day your permit is valid. First-Come, First-Served Permits Permits are also available at any permit issuing station starting one day prior to the beginning of your hike. All wilderness permits must be picked up in person by a member of the hiking group. Priority for permits for a particular trailhead is given to the closest permit issuing station, though it is possible to obtain a permit for any trailhead at any permit issuing station. This mainly affects the most popular trailheads that fill up quickly each morning, such as Little Yosemite Valley trailheads, Lyell Canyon, Cathedral Lakes, among others. Wilderness Permit Reservations Wilderness permit reservations are available up to 24 weeks (168 days) in advance when the wilderness permit reservation office is open (early January through October). Reservations are not available two or fewer days in advance (see below for information about first-come, first-served permits). (View a table showing when you can make a reservation for a specific day.) The cost for each confirmed reservation is $5 plus $5 per person. This fee is non-refundable and non-transferable. Even with a reservation, you, or another member of your hiking group, must pick up the wilderness permit at any permit station during business hours the day of, or the day before, your hike. Reserved permits are held until 10 am on the day of your trip. If you will arrive later than 10 am on the day of your trip, please call us to hold your permit for a late arrival: 209/372-0308 (this number is for cancellations only) . Otherwise, your permit reservation will be canceled. Permits held for late arrival still must be picked up at a permit station during business hours. (You can check current hours for permit stations at the bottom of the wilderness conditions update.) Please plan your trip before you make a reservation. It is your responsibility to research trails and trail conditions to decide which trip is right for you and your group. Park rangers will not plan your trip for you. Before making a reservation, check availability. If the date or trailhead isn't listed, space is available for at least one person (but not necessarily for your entire group). To make a reservation please have the name the permit will be under, mailing address, daytime telephone number, number of people, number of stock animals (horses, mules, llamas), start and end dates, beginning and ending trailheads, principal destination (to help clarify trailhead), method of payment ($5 plus $5/person): credit card, check, or money order. Three Ways to Make a Reservation The reservation office is open January through October and accepts reservations for trips during May through September. Reservations are not necessary for trips during November through April. The park is not accepting reservations via the Internet in 2009. * Fax (preferred): Please complete a reservation form on your computer, then print and fax it to 209/372-0739. Allow two weeks to receive a printed confirmation by mail. If you provide an email address, you will receive a generic confirmation within one business day stating whether you received your first, second, or third choice. If you would like to request a reservation for a departure date within the next two weeks, please apply by phone. * Phone: Please have your trip planned and the above information ready before calling 209/372-0740. The phone is staffed Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Extended hours are in effect from May 25 to September 7, 2009: Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm, Saturday, 9 am to 4 pm; Sunday, 9 am to 12 pm. * Mail: Please complete and print the reservation form, or send a letter with the information requested above, along with payment, to Wilderness Permits, PO Box 545, Yosemite, CA, 95389. Make checks and money orders payable to "Yosemite Association." All major credit cards are accepted. Do not send cash. Please allow two weeks to receive a response. Only apply once for each request: If you apply twice for the same request, you will be charged a non-refundable, non-transferable processing fee for both reservations. Reservation changes: If space is available within the same season, you can request a change to your existing reservation's date or trailhead for no additional charge. If you have questions regarding your reservation, or would like to make changes to an existing reservation, please do so only by calling (209) 372-0740. We are unable to correspond by email or fax. Processing fees are non-refundable and non-transferable. Though popular trailheads may fill up, there is generally space available on other trailheads in the park. From November through April, permits are available without a reservation. Backpackers' Campgrounds Wilderness permit holders may spend one night prior to, and one night after, a backpacking trip in a backpackers' campground (summer only). This service is especially helpful for those wishing to get a first-come, first-served permit the day before beginning the hike. For more information and to download a reservation form, visit http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/wildpermits.htm
10 years ago
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Park Love...
What are the top five arches in Arches National Park by span?
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Arches National Park, Utah, Geology, Hiking
10 years ago
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Arches National Park has more beautiful and unique natural arch and other rock formations than one could ever hope to see on one visit! The five largest arches in the park (by span) are as follows: 1) Landscape Arch (290' and the largest in the world!) 2) Double Arch S (163') 3) South Window Arch (105') 4) North Window Arch (93') 5) Parade of Elephants (85') If you have any more questions about Arches or the Moab, UT area, please visit www.discovermoab.com. OR see also: http://www.ohranger.com/arches/news/2009/its-official-worlds-greatest-arches-are-utah and for the world's largest arches (by span) click here: http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=6532048 Enjoy your trip!
10 years ago
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Park Love...
How often & when are the geology walks at the Yavapai Observation Station at GC?
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Geology
10 years ago
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There are two Geology-focused Ranger Programs at the Yavapai Observation Station: Colorado River Talk Enjoy the grandeur and power of the Colorado River as you explore and discuss the river’s role in Grand Canyon. The program may include a short walk on a paved path. Parking may be limited; plan to arrive by the Village Route shuttle bus to the Yavapai Observation Station stop. Meets at the bicycle rack outside Yavapai Observation Station daily at 10 a.m. (30–45 minutes) Geo-Glimpse Enjoy the geology exhibits at Yavapai Observation Station and explore a selected aspect of the canyon’s geology during these short talks. Meets inside Yavapai Observation Station daily at 3 p.m. (15–20 minutes)
10 years ago
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Horsetooth Reservoir

Horsetooth Reservoir, Colorado-Big Thompson Project, furnishes the main water supply for the Poudre Valley. The reservoir is 6.5 miles long, and is formed by four large earthfill dams. Horsetooth Dam closes the northern end of the valley, and Soldier Canyon, Dixon Canyon, and Spring Canyon Dams close ...

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Things To Do

Activities at Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument include backpacking, biking, birdwatching, camping, fishing, hiking, horseback riding, interpretive programs, nature walks, stargazing, wilderness area activities and wildlife viewing. Guided Tours Guided tours of the cliff dwellings are offered daily at 1 p.m. Please note that the tours start at the Cliff Dwellings ...

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Glossary of Terms

Anticline Rock layers that have been bent so that they bow upwards or fold convex side up. Aquifer A rock layer with enough space between its grains to allow water to flow relatively freely. Butte A hill or very small mountain that is flat topped and steep sides all around. Calcite A mineral composed of calcium ...

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Geology of Yellowstone

Hydrothermal activity results when surface water seeps down to meet the heat of the earth's molten rock. Because molten rock may be as close as three to eight miles below the surface in Yellowstone, the park has the largest and most varied collection of hydrothermal features on Earth. The ...

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Geology Timeline

2.7 billion to 570 million years ago Precambrian History: The most ancient rocks in North America form during the Precambrian era. Huge mountain ranges form and erode away, until Yellowstone is a relatively flat plain. 600 million to 75 million years ago Floods alter the Landscape: The region is periodically flooded by ...

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