Native American History

S.D. Tribe Poised To Take Back Part Of Badlands

May 29, 2012, 9:40 am
Federal officials are about to join hands with a tribe in South Dakota in a proposal to make part of the Badlands National Park the first ever tribally-run national park in the country. The agreement comes after years of sometimes bitter land disputes over the south unit of the ...

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barb bruc...
Where can we find showers when staying in Smokemont canpgrounds at the Great Smoky Mountians?
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Native American History, Camping, Hiking, Park Passes and Fees
5 years ago
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Ask_Chris...
82 Answers
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Unfortunately, there are no showers or electrical or water hookups in the park. However, there are restrooms with cold running water and flush toilets located throughout the campground. The link below is a map of Smokemont Campground, with a key that indicates restroom locations.
Smokemont Campground Map:
http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/upload/Smokemont-map.pdf
Great Smoky Mountains – Frontcountry Camping website: http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/frontcountry-camping.htm

5 years ago
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joedgarza...
Is Yosemite national park crowded in the first week in April?
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Yosemite National Park, California, Civil War, Wildlife Watching, Native American History, Guided Tours, River Rafting, Horseback Riding
5 years ago
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ask_erica
24 Answers
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Yosemite is an exicting park that is popular year-round, especially in the winter and spring. You may miss a lot of the classroom crowds as most students will still be in school. Please note that certain trails and attractions are still closed in April. Call the park at (209) 372-0200 for more information.

5 years ago
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White Mountain Petroglyphs

One of Wyoming's rock art sites, these amazing petroglyphs were created some 1,000 to 200 years ago. Several figures appear to portray bison and elk hunts while others depict geometric forms or tiny footprints. Visitors are encouraged to respect the reverence of the area. Venture 26 miles northeast of ...

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Barbara S...
Where do I complete your survey on state parks so that I may enter to win a pair of LEKI hiking poles?
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Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona, Ancient Cultures, Archaeology, Bird Watching, Native American History, Geology, Wildflowers, Camping
5 years ago
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85 Answers
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Hi Barbara,

Thanks for your interest! The 2011 survey has been completed. We'll have plenty more opportunities to get involved with Oh, Ranger! in the future. If you'd like to stay in touch, sign up for our e-newsletter at http://www.facebook.com/OhRanger?sk=app_100265896690345.

5 years ago
10
omey81
I just want to start out at Moon Lake then leave there and backpack into Brown Duck, and spend 2, maybe 3 days there.
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Ashley National Forest, Moon Lake Reservoir, Utah, Backpacking, Civil War, Fly Fishing, Trail Running, Wildlife Watching, Food/Dining, Mountaineering, Native American History, Deer, Lake Fishing, World War II, Elk, Gear, Marine Life, Moose, Wildflowers, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, History/Culture, Hiking, Park Passes and Fees, Photography, Preservation, Safety, Picnicking
5 years ago
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ask_erica
24 Answers
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It's a short day hike from Moon Lake Campgrounds to the Brown Duck Trail. There's plenty of camping opportunities in nearby East Basin. Please note some trail areas may be inaccessible due to winter weather. For more information, visit the Forest Service's page on Ashley National Forest: http://www.fs.usda.gov/ashley. Have a fun and safe adventure!

5 years ago
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rfisher
I am quite interested in becoming a Park Ranger and was wondering what the marketability and annual pay of a Park Ranger is like.
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Canaan Resort State Park, West Virginia, Susquehanna State Park, Maryland, Archaeology, ATVs, Backpacking, Bears, Bouldering, Bow Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Biking, Downhill Skiing, Four-Wheel Driving, Gun Hunting, Wildlife Watching, Native American History, Swimming, Deer, Lake Fishing, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Marine Life, Moose, Flora & Fauna, Mountain Lions, Historic Sites, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, Fishing, History/Culture, Golfing, Hiking, Hunting, Preservation, Picnicking
5 years ago
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85 Answers
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We often get questions about what it takes to become a National Park Ranger. Here are some tips from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers. We hope you find them helpful:

The National Park Service (NPS) employs people in all kinds of job titles (20,000 year-round and another 7,000 - 10,000 during the summer) even though the general public often thinks that everyone that works for the NPS is a "park ranger."  Of these 30,000 employees, perhaps 7,000 are in positions that are titled park ranger.  I'll concentrate on those for now, but folks interested in maintenance jobs, or administrative jobs, or research and science related jobs should know that those jobs are there too.
 
Park ranger jobs are divided into 2 groups.  First, there are park rangers that primarily perform park interpretation.  These employees work in the park visitors' center, lead guided walks and talks, give off-site programs at local schools, establish and/or modify the park's website, write site-specific brochures and other materials, and design visitor center displays or movies, etc.  In short, this group of park rangers is the parks' primary link between the park resources and park visitors and neighbors.  By explaining the national significance of the individual park and the resources it preserves, interpretive park rangers hope to establish or strengthen visitors' understanding and support for parks, the environment, history, etc.
 
The second group of park rangers are those that primarily perform park protection.  These employees perform law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency medical services, fire management, etc.  They are more likely to be working outside, in all kinds of weather conditions, and they might be doing this in all kinds of modes of transportation, i.e. on foot, on horseback, in vehicles, in boats, on skis, in small planes, etc.  Like interpretive rangers, protection rangers have a great responsibility to be knowledgeable about the parks' resources and threats (from human behavior) to them.  While they have many friendly, informational contacts with visitors, they also have visitor contacts that are sometimes confrontational and can be stressful.
 
For either type of ranger job, a bachelor's degree from a 4-year college or university with a heavy emphasis in the natural sciences or U.S. history is generally required to be competitive.  Any public speaking experience one can gain is also very helpful.  First aid training is available in most communities and having some level of certification in first aid and CPR is helpful.  There is also free online training to anyone at the Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands at Indiana University. Such training helps one understand the NPS mission and culture and shows prospective hiring officials that you are truly interested in becoming an NPS employee.
 
Many folks that hope to be interpretive park rangers often start out working as park volunteers while they are in school or are in some other full-time career.  These opportunities are available at all NPS sites including Lake Mead National Recreation Area just outside Las Vegas.
 
For protection rangers there are a few additional requirements.  You must be at least 21 years old.  You also must be a graduate of one of the NPS-approved Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Academies.  A list of these schools and more information is available online. One can also pursue similar opportunities in your home community to gain experience that might make you more competitive.  Become an ambulance attendant in your community, become a volunteer firefighter with your local fire department or your state forestry department, or become a member of your local community search and rescue squad.
 
Finally, the Association of National Park Rangers (ANPR) is a membership organization open to anyone.  One does not have to be a park ranger or an NPS employee to become an ANPR member.  There are networking and informational opportunities within ANPR that can help one be competitive for NPS jobs, and it is important to understand that it is not just what you know, but also who you know that will help one get their foot in the door with the NPS.  ANPR also offers a publication for sale titled, "Live the Adventure: Join the National Park Service" that can be helpful in understanding the requirements for park ranger jobs.  

For more information about ANPR visit their website.

5 years ago
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Trickster Brings Native American Tales to Life

November 21, 2011, 12:32 pm
It’s been a while since I’ve recommended a book as often as I’ve recommend Trickster: Native American Tales: A Graphic Collection. One part Aesop’s Fables and one part comic strip, this graphic novel is chock-full of beautiful imagery and its folklore is so well-written that you can almost hear ...

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Traveling Exhibit at Ellis Island Brings Story of Alcatraz to NYC

October 6, 2011, 1:29 pm
Can’t make it to San Francisco to visit Alcatraz Island? For a limited time, New Yorkers need only hop a ferry—instead of a flight—to experience “The Rock” firsthand. A traveling exhibit titled “Alcatraz: Life on The Rock,” has arrived at Ellis Island and will run until January 12, 2012. Showcasing ...

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bevinpres...
Planning a trip to Southern Utah Is it reasonable to visit Eastern & Western attractions (NPs) in 7 days - 6 nights from Prescott, AZ?
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Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Zion National Park, Ancient Cultures, Archaeology, Auto/Motorcycle, Wildlife Watching, Bird Watching, Food/Dining, Native American History, Deer, Elk, Historic Sites, Wildflowers, Hiking, Lodging, Photography
6 years ago
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We suggest taking your time and choosing 3-4 parks to really enjoy, plus taking in some sights along the way. Your trip will lead you right through the heart of the Grand Circle, a collection of seven national parks, eight national monuments, numerous state parks, scenic byways, historical sites, prehistoric Indian ruins, colorful ghost towns and stunning geologic formations. Take some time to explore some of these places, including Zion, Canyonlands and Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.

For more information check out www.grandcircle.org and www.utah.com/nationalparks/grandcircle.htm. Some suggested itineraries are available at http://www.utah.com/itineraries/grand_circle.htm.

Also check out this list of park-by-park highlights in the Grand Circle.

6 years ago
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