Photography

Park Love...
What is the cost to ride the Tour Mobile and the time schedule in Washington DC
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Guided Tours, Photography
8 years ago
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Ask_Elif
53 Answers
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Hi,

The American Heritage Tour of Washington DC & Arlington Cemetery Tour--which you can get on and off of all day--costs $27.00. Please see the detailed information below for time schedules and deals:

 Washington DC & Arlington Cemetery

Prices: Adults $27.00
Children (3–11) $13.00
Group Prices: (20 or more people)
Adults $26.00
Children (3–11) $12.50
Operates: Daily except Christmas Day and New Year's Day
Departures: Continuously, with final reboarding 1 hour before closing, as follows: 9:30am–4:30pm
Departs from: Any available stop listed at right
Buy tickets: From drivers, at Tourmobile® booths, or from Ticketmaster at (800) 551–SEAT
 
TWO-DAY American Heritage Tour BEST VALUE!
Operates: Available at 9:30 a.m. daily except Christmas and New Year's Day. Good all day of purchase and entire next day!
Prices: Adults $35.00
Children (3–11) $17.00
Buy tickets: From drivers, or at Tourmobile® booths.

Make sure to pick up a copy of our little green Oh, Ranger!® guide to the National Mall and Memorial Parks. It's full of history and information that will help guide you during your trip!

8 years ago
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Park Love...
Approximately how long will it take to drive from Bryce NP to Moab, UT, and what route do you recommend?
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Bryce Canyon National Park, Auto/Motorcycle, Photography
8 years ago
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85 Answers
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Your trip will be taking you right through the Grand Circle. (www.grandcircle.org) This collection of seven national parks, eight national monuments, numerous state parks, scenic byways, historical sites, prehistoric Indian ruins, colorful ghost towns and stunning geologic formations offers lots to see and do!

You’ll travel between about 300 and 450 miles, and your trip will take between four and six hours, depending on the route you choose. The highway route through Cedar City and along Interstates 15 and 70 is quicker, and will allow you to stop at Cedar Breaks National Monument (www.ohranger.com/cedar-breaks). It’s one of the Grand Circle’s best-kept secrets, and may be on its way to becoming a national park! Get the full story here: http://www.ohranger.com/cedar-breaks/news/2009/cedar-breaks-america%E2%80%99s-next-national-park.

The longer trip, along routes 12 and 24, will allow you to experience Utah’s less-traveled roads and take you through Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (http://www.ohranger.com/grand-staircase-escalante) and Capitol Reef National Park (http://www.ohranger.com/capitol-reef).

Choose the route that’s best for you, but either way, dedicate an entire day to the drive, so you can explore the sights in the area!

While you’re in the Grand Circle, consider stopping at Zion (www.ohranger.com/zion), Canyonlands (www.ohranger.com/canyonlands) and Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park (http://www.ohranger.com/canyonlands/5-things-see-canyonlands). For more information check out www.grandcircle.org and www.utah.com/nationalparks/grandcircle.htm. Some suggested itineraries are available at http://www.utah.com/itineraries/grand_circle.htm.


8 years ago
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Park Love...
Where to go hiking in the Colorado Springs area
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Deer, Elk, Moose, Hiking, Photography, Touring
8 years ago
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85 Answers
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Colorado Springs is a great place for hiking! You’re close to many Colorado State Parks, including Aiken Canyon Natural Area,  (http://parks.state.co.us/NaturalResources/CNAP/NaturalAreasInfo/AlphabeticalListing/AikenCanyon.htm) Mueller State Park and Wildlife Area (http://www.ohranger.com/co/mueller) and Pike National Forest (http://www.ohranger.com/comanche-cimarron-natl-grasslands).

The wildlife preserve at Aiken Canyon is a great place to watch for animals, as it is home to bear, mountain lion, elk, mule deer, bobcat, fox, squirrels and rattlesnakes.

The Dome Rock Trail at Mueller State Park and Wildlife Area is another great place to see wildlife, especially bighorn sheep!

Steve Garufi, a Colorado resident, has made a great list of local Colorado Springs hikes, which is available at http://www.stevegarufi.com/colorado-springs-hikes.htm.

Also check http://www.cospringstrails.com/ and http://www.localhikes.com/msa/msa_1720.asp for more listings.

Come back to let us know which ones you choose!
8 years ago
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Park Love...
Is there cell phone coverage at Yellowstone?
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Yellowstone National Park, Montana, Auto/Motorcycle, Photography
8 years ago
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Yes, but it can be a bit hit or miss, and it can vary depending on your carrier. Probably the best cell coverage in Yellowstone is near the Old Faithful geyser. Tucked between the hotels and gift shops is a cell tower. I have AT&T, and had full coverage there last summer. I have heard from other travelers that Verizon has better coverage as you drive around the many, many miles of the park, even though it may not always be full strength.
8 years ago
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millern
Where do I purchase a Park Pass?
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Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, Backpacking, Photography
8 years ago
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Expert Answer
48 Answers
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You can purchase a park pass (also known as the America the Beautiful Pass, Federal Recreation Pass) at the entrance station of any national park unit that charges fees. You can also purchase online at www.parkpass.net. Your Annual Pass covers Entrance Fees or Standard Amenity Fees at sites managed by USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation. • Valid for one full year from month of purchase. • Provides entrance or access to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single, private, non-commercial vehicle at Federally operated recreation sites across the country. • Covers the pass holder and three (3) accompanying adults age 16 and older at sites where per person entrance fees are charged. No entry fee for children 15 and under. • Photo identification may be required to verify ownership. • Passes are NON-REFUNDABLE, NON-TRANSFERABLE, and cannot be replaced if lost or stolen. • Fees vary widely across the thousands of Federal Recreation sites. Please contact specific sites directly for information on what is or is not covered. • If you are 62 or older or receive disability benefits, you may be eligible for the Senior or Access pass.
8 years ago
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Park Love...
How many days do we need to see most of Yellowstone National Park?
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Yellowstone National Park, Bears, Guided Tours, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Moose, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Photography
8 years ago
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1 Answer
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Besides being the oldest National Park in the world, Yellowstone is also among the largest at 2+ million acres. And while it is technically possible to drive through the park in a single day, I wouldn't recommend spending less than 2 or 3 days in this park. There is really so much to do and see; fly fishing the Madison River, hiking among the travertine terraces of Mammoth Hot Springs, photographing the many, many geysers near Old Faithful, watching the wildlife in Lamar Valley and Hayden Valley, viewing the water falls in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. This list could go on and on. If you are going to travel all the way to Yellowstone, it's worth spending as much time there as you can. It is truly a magical place. On your return, let us know how your trip went!
8 years ago
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Cooper
12 Answers
You should try to see Yellowstone in the winter. 5 days (on snowcoach or snowmobile) will give you an appreciation of the park's unique beauty and power unmatched by any summer visit! I'm sure this site can give you some ideas as to how to plan that trip, but you can always call Xanterra Parks and Resorts at the park and they'll tell you what you need to know.
8 years ago
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hopesfren...
1 Answer
I would leave at least four days. There are four/five major areas of the park, and each area could easily take a day, especially if you want to hike around and do programs. The areas would include: Old Faithful Area, Lake Area, Canyon Area, and Mammoth Area. Old Faithful: waterfalls, lots of geothermal features, be sure to go to the Inn and check it out (it's an amazing building) Yellowstone Lake: boating, hiking, some cool little towns, and some geothermal stuff Canyon: prime wildlife viewing at Hayden Valley and Lamar Valley (we got caught in the middle of a buffalo herd at the beautiful lamar valley!), waterfalls (mostly drive-up). Mammoth: I didn't really do much here except go to the hot springs (which you MUST see, especially at sunset), but there were some neat-sounding hikes like Beaver Ponds. Yellowstone is SUCH an adventure! have a blast! Four days will be a whirlwind, so I would recommend five or more. morethanaweekend.com
8 years ago
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Expert Answer
85 Answers
31Helpful Answer Rating
Some great suggestions for things to do at Yellowstone are available here: http://www.ohranger.com/yellowstone/news/2009/yellowstone-adventures
8 years ago
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Park Love...
What are our chances of getting into the park on the 30th of June? Want to tent camp, hike.
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Yosemite National Park, California, Backpacking, Gear, Geology, Photography
8 years ago
2
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Expert Answer
48 Answers
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You'll have no problem getting into the park and hike to your heart's content. If you want to camp in the backcountry, though, you'll need to obtain a FREE wilderness permits that is available both via reservation and on a first-come, first-serve basis. Yosemite National Park has a trailhead quota system limiting the number of people entering a particular trailhead on a given day. This system is designed to reduce impacts and to avoid overcrowding, in keeping with the Wilderness Act's mandate of providing "outstanding opportunities for solitude." Of each daily quota for a trailhead, 60 percent can be reserved ahead of time while the remaining 40 percent is available on a first-come, first-served basis one day prior to, or the same day as, the beginning of your hike. The quota system is based on where you begin your hike, and in some cases, on where you camp the first night of your trip. After the first night, you may hike to another section of the Wilderness without restriction. For this reason, even if you have a permit lasting for several days, you may not begin your trip on any day except the first day your permit is valid. First-Come, First-Served Permits Permits are also available at any permit issuing station starting one day prior to the beginning of your hike. All wilderness permits must be picked up in person by a member of the hiking group. Priority for permits for a particular trailhead is given to the closest permit issuing station, though it is possible to obtain a permit for any trailhead at any permit issuing station. This mainly affects the most popular trailheads that fill up quickly each morning, such as Little Yosemite Valley trailheads, Lyell Canyon, Cathedral Lakes, among others. Wilderness Permit Reservations Wilderness permit reservations are available up to 24 weeks (168 days) in advance when the wilderness permit reservation office is open (early January through October). Reservations are not available two or fewer days in advance (see below for information about first-come, first-served permits). (View a table showing when you can make a reservation for a specific day.) The cost for each confirmed reservation is $5 plus $5 per person. This fee is non-refundable and non-transferable. Even with a reservation, you, or another member of your hiking group, must pick up the wilderness permit at any permit station during business hours the day of, or the day before, your hike. Reserved permits are held until 10 am on the day of your trip. If you will arrive later than 10 am on the day of your trip, please call us to hold your permit for a late arrival: 209/372-0308 (this number is for cancellations only) . Otherwise, your permit reservation will be canceled. Permits held for late arrival still must be picked up at a permit station during business hours. (You can check current hours for permit stations at the bottom of the wilderness conditions update.) Please plan your trip before you make a reservation. It is your responsibility to research trails and trail conditions to decide which trip is right for you and your group. Park rangers will not plan your trip for you. Before making a reservation, check availability. If the date or trailhead isn't listed, space is available for at least one person (but not necessarily for your entire group). To make a reservation please have the name the permit will be under, mailing address, daytime telephone number, number of people, number of stock animals (horses, mules, llamas), start and end dates, beginning and ending trailheads, principal destination (to help clarify trailhead), method of payment ($5 plus $5/person): credit card, check, or money order. Three Ways to Make a Reservation The reservation office is open January through October and accepts reservations for trips during May through September. Reservations are not necessary for trips during November through April. The park is not accepting reservations via the Internet in 2009. * Fax (preferred): Please complete a reservation form on your computer, then print and fax it to 209/372-0739. Allow two weeks to receive a printed confirmation by mail. If you provide an email address, you will receive a generic confirmation within one business day stating whether you received your first, second, or third choice. If you would like to request a reservation for a departure date within the next two weeks, please apply by phone. * Phone: Please have your trip planned and the above information ready before calling 209/372-0740. The phone is staffed Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Extended hours are in effect from May 25 to September 7, 2009: Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm, Saturday, 9 am to 4 pm; Sunday, 9 am to 12 pm. * Mail: Please complete and print the reservation form, or send a letter with the information requested above, along with payment, to Wilderness Permits, PO Box 545, Yosemite, CA, 95389. Make checks and money orders payable to "Yosemite Association." All major credit cards are accepted. Do not send cash. Please allow two weeks to receive a response. Only apply once for each request: If you apply twice for the same request, you will be charged a non-refundable, non-transferable processing fee for both reservations. Reservation changes: If space is available within the same season, you can request a change to your existing reservation's date or trailhead for no additional charge. If you have questions regarding your reservation, or would like to make changes to an existing reservation, please do so only by calling (209) 372-0740. We are unable to correspond by email or fax. Processing fees are non-refundable and non-transferable. Though popular trailheads may fill up, there is generally space available on other trailheads in the park. From November through April, permits are available without a reservation. Backpackers' Campgrounds Wilderness permit holders may spend one night prior to, and one night after, a backpacking trip in a backpackers' campground (summer only). This service is especially helpful for those wishing to get a first-come, first-served permit the day before beginning the hike. For more information and to download a reservation form, visit http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/wildpermits.htm
8 years ago
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White River National Wildlife Refuge

White River National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1935 for the protection of migratory birds. The refuge lies in the floodplain of the White River near where it meets the mighty Mississippi River. White River NWR is one of the largest remaining bottomland hardwood forests in the Mississippi ...

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Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge

Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is located along the Bitterroot River in the scenic and historic Bitterroot Valley of western Montana. Surrounded by the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountain Ranges, the Refuge offers spectacular viewing opportunities of the landscape and wildlife. The Refuge was established in 1963 to ...

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Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

Alaska's Kenai Peninsula is, in geologic terms, still quite "young," since its entire land mass was covered by glacial ice as recently as 10,000 years ago. Much of that frozen blanket still exists today, in the form of the more than 800-square mile Harding Ice Field, which the refuge ...

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