Safety

haleywhoa
What threats does yosemite national park face?
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Yosemite National Park, California, Preservation, Safety
10 years ago
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Unfortunately, the answer to this question is that there are numerous threats to the park and its Ecosystem, as well as to the infrastructure needs to maintain a safe and inviting place to visit.

The most basic threats that are always present seem to be: natural and non-natural fires, exotic/invasive plant and animal species, air pollution and the effects of climate change. 

The National Park Service has a well written article on the park ecosytem.  You follow the link here, (and below is a blurb from the article):

http://www.nps.gov/archive/yose/nature/nature.htm


"Threats to park resources and the integrity of park ecosystems include loss of natural fire regimes, air pollutants and air-borne contaminants, global climate change, direct impacts to resources from high visitation in some areas of the park, habitat fragmentation from both outside and inside park boundaries, and the invasion of non-native plant and animal species. The park is actively attempting to control the non-native plant species that pose the most serious threat, such as spotted knapweed, yellow star-thistle, bull thistle, and Himalayan blackberry. The presence of wild turkeys, white-tailed ptarmigan, bullfrogs, introduced fish and other non-native animal species in Yosemite threaten the park's native species."

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Hope that's what you were looking for!

10 years ago
10
sldishman...
We will be in Sedona, Az,8-28 thru 9-4 - we will visit the grand canyon - what would be the number one thing to do in your opinion
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Grand Canyon National Park, Native American History, Guided Tours, Gear, Ranger-led Programs, Health & Fitness, Wildflowers, Hiking, Park Passes and Fees, Photography, Safety
10 years ago
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cal34
4 Answers
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This is actually not an easy question to answer as there are a lot of wonderful things to do.  It really depends on how much time you have.  The first thing you should do is just take a look.  The canyon is magnificent and all the pictures you have seen don't do it justice.  Take a walk around the canyon.  I assume you will be visiting the south rim and around the rim there is a nice easy trail you can walk on to get different views of the canyon.  If you are up for a more rigorous hike, go down into the canyon.  Either the Bright Angel Trail or the South Kaibab Trail will provide you different perspectives of the canyon and you can hike as little or as much as you want.  Get up early to watch the sunrise or find a spot to watch the sunset.  At the beginning and the end of the day you can watch the colors of the canyon change and get the most dramatic views.  And stop at one of the visitor centers and talk to the park rangers.  There is a daily schedule of ranger led talks and walks where you can learn about Grand Canyon history, geology, animal and plant life, etc.

We were just there in May and had a wonderful time.  I hope you do too.

10 years ago
10
Red_Box
On a scale from rat to suckling pig, how delicious is squirrel meat? I prefer to feast on wild critter when camping.
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Patapsco Valley State Park, Maryland, Camping, Safety
10 years ago
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It's hard to say there Red_Box...  I'm not much for squirrel or suckling pig myself so the comparison would lack integrity.  Rat can be a tasty specimen if prepared correctly, but you have to watch out for the tail - takes a reeeeal long time going down!

These days, given the economy and all, lots of folks are looking to try new, more available kinds of game...  In fact, seems some have found raccoon a nice protein substitute.  

http://www.yumsugar.com/2697901?page=0%2C1

On the topic of squirrel, these two articles should help get you started on your culinary journey.

http://www.jerrysbaitandtackle.com/Recipes/Squirrel.htm
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/dining/07squirrel.html

 
Please do keep in mind that OhRanger.com does not advocate the killing or eating of wild animals, especially on public lands.  If you do decide to follow through on this question, I hope you'll be safe and make sure to brush your teeth!

Happy Trails!


10 years ago
20
mccmissy
3 Answers
3Helpful Answer Rating
Barbecued squirrel is very good.
10 years ago
10
mongokod
Are there many ticks in Yellowstone as of today, August 15? I m considering a last minute trip for 5 days next week; am somewhat hesitant!
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Yellowstone National Park, Safety
10 years ago
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164 Answers
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This is a really good question, and thank you for bringing it up as many visitors are likely to have similar concerns. 


The basic answer to your question is no.  As of mid-August there should not be many active ticks in the park.  Once the dry season starts (around mid-July) they start to decrease in numbers.  The night temperatures in the park are also currently hovering just around freezing - hard to believe I know - a climate in which ticks really won't survive and they'll move to lower elevations.  However, as you would anywhere, do be prepared just in case.  While most ticks have likely left the park, there may be some around and better to dress and be prepared.  Here's some more information on ticks taken from OhRanger.com:

"A tick is an arachnid, a member of the spider family. Like a mosquito, it feeds on blood from larger, warmblooded animals in order to reproduce. It is also similar to the mosquito because it can carry disease. Ticks are found throughout Yellowstone particularly in the meadows through July, though they can linger longer.  Use a repellent with DEET and check for them regularly by running fingers through areas that are exposed.  Also, wear longer socks or pants and long sleeves during heavy tick season. If a tick becomes embedded  in the skin, remove it carefully and completely with tweezers.  Be sure to pick up the informative brochure about ticks at any park visitor center and seek medical attention if a rash appears at the bite and you experience flu-like symptoms."

Have a safe and exciting trip.  Be sure to check back with us when you return to share pictures, stories and as always ask more questions!

10 years ago
00
Mickey
How do you become a ranger?
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Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Bears, Bird Watching, Deer, Guided Tours, Elk, Gear, Ranger-led Programs, Moose, Wolves, Camping, Kids Activities, Safety, Volcanology
10 years ago
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85 Answers
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Your question is a popular one! For more about becoming a National Park ranger, check out this answer from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers.

 For more about becoming at sate park ranger, check out this answer.

10 years ago
00
Expert Answer
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This answer come to you from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers. We hope you find it helpful:

The National Park Service (NPS) employs people in all kinds of job titles (20,000 year-round and another 7,000 - 10,000 during the summer) even though the general public often thinks that everyone that works for the NPS is a "park ranger."  Of these 30,000 employees, perhaps 7,000 are in positions that are titled park ranger.  I'll concentrate on those for now, but folks interested in maintenance jobs, or administrative jobs, or research and science related jobs should know that those jobs are there too.
 
Park ranger jobs are divided into 2 groups.  First, there are park rangers that primarily perform park interpretation.  These employees work in the park visitors' center, lead guided walks and talks, give off-site programs at local schools, establish and/or modify the park's website, write site-specific brochures and other materials, and design visitor center displays or movies, etc.  In short, this group of park rangers is the parks' primary link between the park resources and park visitors and neighbors.  By explaining the national significance of the individual park and the resources it preserves, interpretive park rangers hope to establish or strengthen visitors' understanding and support for parks, the environment, history, etc.
 
The second group of park rangers are those that primarily perform park protection.  These employees perform law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency medical services, fire management, etc.  They are more likely to be working outside, in all kinds of weather conditions, and they might be doing this in all kinds of modes of transportation, i.e. on foot, on horseback, in vehicles, in boats, on skis, in small planes, etc.  Like interpretive rangers, protection rangers have a great responsibility to be knowledgeable about the parks' resources and threats (from human behavior) to them.  While they have many friendly, informational contacts with visitors, they also have visitor contacts that are sometimes confrontational and can be stressful.
 
For either type of ranger job, a bachelor's degree from a 4-year college or university with a heavy emphasis in the natural sciences or U.S. history is generally required to be competitive.  Any public speaking experience one can gain is also very helpful.  First aid training is available in most communities and having some level of certification in first aid and CPR is helpful.  There is also free online training to anyone at the Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands at Indiana University. Such training helps one understand the NPS mission and culture and shows prospective hiring officials that you are truly interested in becoming an NPS employee.
 
Many folks that hope to be interpretive park rangers often start out working as park volunteers while they are in school or are in some other full-time career.  These opportunities are available at all NPS sites including Lake Mead National Recreation Area just outside Las Vegas.
 
For protection rangers there are a few additional requirements.  You must be at least 21 years old.  You also must be a graduate of one of the NPS-approved Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Academies.  A list of these schools and more information is available online. One can also pursue similar opportunities in your home community to gain experience that might make you more competitive.  Become an ambulance attendant in your community, become a volunteer firefighter with your local fire department or your state forestry department, or become a member of your local community search and rescue squad.
 
Finally, the Association of National Park Rangers (ANPR) is a membership organization open to anyone.  One does not have to be a park ranger or an NPS employee to become an ANPR member.  There are networking and informational opportunities within ANPR that can help one be competitive for NPS jobs, and it is important to understand that it is not just what you know, but also who you know that will help one get their foot in the door with the NPS.  ANPR also offers a publication for sale titled, "Live the Adventure: Join the National Park Service" that can be helpful in understanding the requirements for park ranger jobs.  

For more information about ANPR visit their website.

8 years ago
00
Park Love...
Are grills available at picnic areas in Nyack State park?
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New York, Swimming, Kids Activities, Safety, Picnicking
10 years ago
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Yes, grills are available at picnic areas throughout Nyack Beach State Park.

For more information about the facilities, visit the New York State Parks website.

10 years ago
00
jps847
Your lost in the woods and you need water and food how would you get it? what plants would be edible and how would you get purified water?
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Cleveland National Forest, Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks, Yosemite National Park, California, Backpacking, Marine Life, Health & Fitness, Flora & Fauna, Wildflowers, Hiking, Safety
10 years ago
2
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First off, reduce your chances of getting lost in the wilderness by following these hiking safety tips.

Wilderness-survival.net is a great source for survial tips, including water procurement and finding edible plants.

10 years ago
00
jps847
What is a list of the must haves on preparing for a backpacking trip?
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Yosemite National Park, California, Backpacking, Gear, Safety
10 years ago
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1 Answer
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It's a great question, and one that can be debated year over year by hikers everywhere. I find that a lot of it is personal preference, for instance, I can't imagine hiking on the trails without some type of camera in my pack. But, there is a standard list that has been refined over years described as the "Ten Essentials"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Essentials

  • Map
  • Compass (optionally supplemented with a GPS receiver)
  • Sunglasses and sunscreen
  • Extra food and water
  • Extra clothes
  • Headlamp/flashlight
  • First aid kit
  • Fire starter
  • Matches
  • Knife 

I've found that if you make a little kit bag that includes all these things, it is easy to toss in your pack every time you head out. In fact, we keep a little kit like this in our car, just in case we need something.

Of course, you'll need a backpack too!

10 years ago
00
Meag
Are dogs allowed in the Olympic National Park?
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Olympic National Park, Washington, Kayaking, Camping, Hiking, Preservation, Safety, Picnicking
10 years ago
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Yes, you can bring your dog to the park, however, you can't take Fido hiking on any of the trails. You're allowed to have your dog pretty much anywhere you can drive your car, so, places like campgrounds, picnic areas and roads. The park asks that you keep your dog on a leash at all times. This is really for the safety of the dog, as the call of the wild may just be too much of a temptation! Plus, the magnificent elk, cougar, and bear population probably wouldn't play nice.

There is one exception to the "road" rule. You are allowed to bring your dog to a couple beaches in the park - Rialto Beach and Kalaloch Beach. Check out the park's pet page for more info : http://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/pets.htm
10 years ago
00
Park Love...
Are dogs allowed in Yellowstone?
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Yellowstone National Park, Camping, Safety
10 years ago
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Yes. Owners must assume complete responsibility for their pets, which must be leashed at all times. For the safety of your pet and the wildlife, pets are prohibited on trails, in the backcountry and all thermal areas. Pets are allowed in campgrounds and in cabin units of the park's lodging facilities, but may not be left unattended. There are no kennels in the park.

For more information about park regulations, visit http://www.ohranger.com/yellowstone/yellowstone-regulations.
10 years ago
00
REDHEAD
1 Answer
no there not but if you more about it go to this link http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/pets.htm
10 years ago
00
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