Cedar Breaks National Monument

Cedar Breaks National Monument

Animals

Animals of Cedar Breaks

Mammals

Bats

Carnivores

Even-toed Ungulates

Rodents

Pikas, Rabbits, & Hares

Shrews

Shrews

Dusky Shrew (Sorex obscurus)

Masked Shrew (Sorex cinereus)

Northern Water Shrew (Sorex palustris)

Squirrels

Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (Citellus lateralis)

Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus)

Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)

Mice

Canyon Mouse (Peromyscus crinitus)

Deer Mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus)

Great Basin Pocket Mouse (Perognathus parvus)

House Mouse (Mus musculus)

Pinyon Mouse (Peromyscus truei)

Western Harvest Mouse (Reithrodontomys megalotis)

Rats

Bushy-tailed Wood Rat (Neotoma cinerea)

Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus)

Carnivores

Badger (Taxidea taxus)

Black Bear (Ursus americanus)

Bobcat (Lynx rufus)

Coyote (Canis latrans)

Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)

Long-tailed Weasel (Mustela frenata)

Mountain Lion (Felis concolor)

Red Fox (Vulpes fulva)

Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis)

Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius)

Pikas Rabbits and Hares

Pika (Ochotona princeps)

White-tailed Jackrabbit (Lepus townsendi)

Rodents

Bushy-tailed Wood Rat (Neotoma cinerea)

Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (Citellus lateralis)

Longtail Vole (Microtus longicaudus)

Mice

Mountain Vole (Microtus montanus)

Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus)

Northern Pocket Gopher (Thomomys talpoides)

Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus)

Porcupine (Erethison dorsatum)

Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)

Uinta Chipmunk (Eutamias umbrinus)

Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventris)

Voles

Longtail Vole (Microtus longicaudus)

Mountain Vole (Microtus montanus)

Even-toed Ungulates

Elk (Cervus canadensis)

Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus)

Birds

Below is a list of the abundant and common birds at Cedar Breaks. Others have been seen or found in the park, but on a rare basis.

Birds of Prey

Chickadees

Creeper

Finches

Grosbeaks

Grouse

Hummingbirds

Jays and Ravens

Juncos

Kinglets

Night hawks and Swifts

Sparrows

Swallows

Tanager

Thrushes

Warblers

Woodpeckers

Bats

Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus)

Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)

Spotted Bat (Euderma maculata)

Western Big-eared Bat (Plecotus townsendi)

Tanager

Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana)

Thrushes

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus)

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)

Robin (Turdus migratorius)

Juncos

Dark-eyed Junco (Gray-headed & Oregon) (Junco hyemalis)

Hummingbirds

Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus)

Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus)

Warblers

MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei)

Orange-crowned Warbler (Vermivora celata)

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata)

Creepers

Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)

Grouse

Blue Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus)

Birds of Prey

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

Chickadees

Mountain Chickadee (Parus gambeli)

Night hawks and Swifts

White-throated Swift (Aeronautes saxatalis)

Kinglets

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)

Jays and Ravens

Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga Columbiana)

Common Raven (Corvus corax)

 

Sparrows

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca)

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus)

White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Woodpeckers

Common Flicker (Colaptes auratus)

Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)

Swallows

Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina)

Grosbeaks

Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator)

Finches

Cassin's Finch (Carpodacus cassinii)

Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus)

Insects, Spiders, Centipedes, Millipedes

Spruce Bark Beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis)

The Spruce Bark beetle is native to the Markagunt Plateau and, like fire, act as an agent of renewal in old forests. As you drive through the park, you will notice many dead spruce trees. The beetle is responsible for these dead trees.

The beetle lays its eggs in the bark of the Engelmann Spruce trees. The beetle larvae tunnel through the live wood of the tree, cutting off the flow of water and nutrients to the tops of the trees. After the second year of infestation the tree's needles turn brown and fall off indicating the tree's demise.