Fishtrap Lake

Quick Facts

Fishtrap Lake

Kentucky

(509) 536-1200

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you and your family to this vital flood control and recreation development project. Come and enjoy the natural scenic beauty of southeastern Kentucky countryside and the recreational facilities at Fishtrap Lake!

For the self motivated person, Fishtrap Lake offers many volunteer activities including, campground host, lake clean ups, tree and flower planting, wildlife enhancement programs such as, bird house building and placement, food plot planting, and fish attractor programs, just to name a few. For more information please contact the Volunteer Program Coordinator at the project office.

Map of Fishtrap Lake

Latitude, Longitude: 37.417327, -82.361198

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Activities

  • Boating

    Launch ramps for the boating enthusiasts and fishermen are located at the Fishtrap Marina, Grapevine and Lick Creek Recreation Areas. There is a fee for launching; please contact the main phone number for more information.

  • Bicycling

    Access into the Wildlife Management Area is restricted to non-motorized vehicles. Hiking, horseback riding and mountain bikes are permitted unless otherwise signed.

  • Camping

    Fishtrap Lake has one campground located at the Grapevine Recreation Area. Grapevine Campground has 28 sites, now with 10 sites equipped with water and electrical hookups. Each site has, impacted gravel pads, picnic table, fire ring, and lantern pole. Campground opens Memorial Day Weekend, (Friday of the holiday weekend) and closes the day after Labor Day.

  • Fishing

    Fish and wildlife management is a shared responsibility -the Department of Natural Resources and the Corps manage the fish and wildlife programs by habitat improvement, nesting site development, and food-plot programs for the benefit of many fish and wildlife species.

  • Historic Sites

    Archaeological investigations in the Fishtrap lake area resulted in the recording of 33 prehistoric native American sites including 1 rock shelter, 8 late prehistoric village sites, and 24 open camp sites. Excavations at what is called the Sloane site at Woodside recovered 65,000 artifacts, now stored at the University of Kentucky. Life-styles of the pioneers, primarily of English and Scot Ancestry, consisted mainly of subsistence farming, hunting, trapping and timbering. The mountains provided a degree of security and privacy and also fostered an isolation of early cultural traits. Pike County was formed from a part of Floyd County in December of 1821, and was named in honor of the popular military hero, General Zebulon M. Pike. Later historical studies focus primarily on the Hatfield-McCoy feud in which Pike County, and what is now Mingo County, West Virginia, played major geographic role.

  • Horseback Riding

    A developed hiking and horseback riding can be accessed at the Lick Creek Recreation area where the trail begins. Also, several local equestrians and hikers do use existing oil/gas well roads.

  • Hunting

    Fish and wildlife management is a shared responsibility -the Department of Natural Resources and the Corps manage the fish and wildlife programs by habitat improvement, nesting site development, and food-plot programs for the benefit of many fish and wildlife species.

  • Picnicking

    Picnic shelters are located at the Lick Creek Park and Lundy Rowe Memorial Park, (Administered by Pike County), Grapevine and Dam Site Recreation Areas, (Administered by Corps of Engineers). All shelters are available on a first come - first served basis EXCEPT WHEN RESERVED IN ADVANCE (a fee is required for reserving a shelter). Fishtrap Lake no longer takes shelter reservations at the project office. Persons wanting to reserve a group picnic shelter for the 2006 recreation season in the Dam Site and Grapevine Recreation Areas, at Fishtrap Lake, can do so by calling the National Recreation Reservation System (NRRS) at their toll free number 1-877-444-6777

  • Water Sports

    No developed swimming facilities currently exist. Swimming is at your own risk unless otherwise signed.

Directions

Driving

To the Project Office: From U.S. Route 23 take U.S. Route 460 and 80 to State Route 1789, (3 miles to Project Office).

Phone Numbers

Primary

(509) 536-1200

Links