Ironwood Forest National Monument

Quick Facts

Ironwood Forest National Monument

Arizona

(520) 258-7203

Map Directions

Things To Do

   

Overview

This Ironwood Forest National Monument is made up of 129,000-acres and contains a significant system of cultural and historical sites covering a 5,000 year period. Possessing one of the richest stands of ironwood in the Sonoran Desert, the monument also encompasses several desert mountain ranges including the Silver Bell, Waterman, and Sawtooth, with desert valleys in between. Elevation ranges from 1,800 to 4,261 feet. Three areas within the monument, the Los Robles Archeological District, the Mission of Santa Ana del Chiquiburitac and the Cocoraque Butte Archeological District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Taking its name from one of the longest living trees in the Arizona desert, the 129,000-acre Ironwood Forest National Monument is a true Sonoran Desert showcase. Keeping company with the ironwood trees are mesquite, palo verde, creosote, and saguaro, blanketing the monument floor beneath rugged mountain ranges named Silver Bell, Waterman and Sawtooth. In between, desert valleys lay quietly to complete the setting. Elevations here range from 1,800 to more than 4,200 feet. Three areas within the monument, the Los Robles Archeological District, the Mission of Santa Ana del Chiquiburitac and the Cocoraque Butte Archeological District, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Map of Ironwood Forest

Latitude, Longitude: 32.440249, -111.557922

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Activities

  • Camping

    Primitive camping is available on the monument. Lodging is available in Tucson and Casa Grande.

  • Historic Sites

    Ragged Top Mountain is the biological and geological crown jewel of the national monument. Several endangered and threatened species live here, including the Nichols turk's head cactus and the lesser long-nosed bat. The national monument also contains habitat for the cactus ferruginous pygmy owl. The desert bighorn sheep dwelling in the region are the last viable population indigenous to the Tucson basin. The area holds abundant rock art sites and other archaeological objects of scientific interest. Humans have inhabited the area for more than 5,000 years. More than 200 sites from the prehistoric Hohokam period (600 A.D. to 1440 A.D.) have been recorded in the area. In more modern times, the area was a source of minerals and continues to support active mining operations today.

Park Partners

The nearest stores are in Marana or Tucson, AZ.

Directions

Driving

The Ironwood Forest National Monument is located 25 miles northwest of Tucson, and about one hour by highway south of Phoenix. There are two main points of entry * Interstate 10 at Avra Valley Road, and Interstate 10 from the Red Rock exit, southwest on Sasco Road to Silverbell Road.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(520) 258-7203

Links