Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

Quick Facts

Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

Oregon

(541) 783-3380

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

The Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1958 "... as an inviolate sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds." The refuge primarily consists of 40,000 acres of wet meadows and open water wetlands. This large natural marsh, with a backdrop of the Cascade Mountain Range in central Oregon, encompasses the upper reaches of the Williamson River and provides important nesting, feeding, and staging habitat for waterfowl and sandhill crane. The refuge also appears to be one of the last remaining strongholds of the spotted frog, a candidate for the endangered species list. This refuge along with the 15,000 acres of wetlands on the nearby Upper Klamath Refuge has a rich cultural heritage. It includes part of the historic lands and former reservation used by the Klamath tribes. The initial tract of 16,400 acres was purchased from the Klamath Indians with Federal Duck Stamp funds in 1958. Additional acquisitions from private landowners over the last 10 years have boosted the refuge to its current size. The Tribes have a keen interest in ongoing management activities due to their historic ties to the marshlands.

Map of Klamath Marsh NWR

Latitude, Longitude: 42.002366, -121.714783

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Activities

  • Boating

    A self-guided canoe trail is located on the 700 acres of open water at the southern tip of the refuge. Generally, the canoe area is open during daylight hours from July 1-September 30, but may be closed due to fluctuating water levels. Only motorless boats may be used, and camping and overnight use are prohibited.

  • Bird Watching

    Spring and fall are best for waterfowl: mallards, cinnamon teals, redheads, scaups, gadwalls, ringneck ducks, and Canada geese. Pied-billed and western grebes, pelicans, ospreys, and sandhill cranes can be seen.

  • Bicycling

    A 10-mile trail meanders by the marshland and through the forested upland. Open to mountain biking, the trail also serves as vehicle access to the refuge canoe area.

  • Hiking

    A 10-mile trail meanders by the marshland and through the forested upland. Open to hiking, cross-country skiing, and mountain biking, the trail also serves as vehicle access to the refuge canoe area.

Directions

Driving

From Klamath Falls, Oregon: travel north on Highway 97 approximately 45 miles. Turn right onto Silver Lake Road and travel east 9.5 miles to Forest Service Road 690.

Travel south 4 miles on this gravel road to the canoe launch. To travel to the refuge headquarters, stay on the Silver Lake Road until milepost 17.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(541) 783-3380

Links