Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Quick Facts

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Oregon

(503) 861-2471

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks are comprised of 1,824 acres in Washington and 1,421 acres in Oregon, with the two extremity sites being a two hour drive from each other. Fort Clatsop was the winter encampment for the Corps of discovery from December 1805 to March 1806. The visitor center includes the Fort Clatsop exhibit built by the explorers, an interpretive center offering an exhibit hall, gift shop and an orientation film. The center features ranger-led programs, re-enactors in the fort and trailheads for the Fort to Sea Trail and Netul River Trail as well as restrooms and a picnic area. Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks are comprised of 1,824 acres in Washington and 1,421 acres in Oregon, with the two extremity sites being a two hour drive from each other. Fort Clatsop was the winter encampment for the Corps of discovery from December 1805 to March 1806. The visitor center includes the Fort Clatsop exhibit built by the explorers, an interpretive center offering an exhibit hall, gift shop and an orientation film. The center features ranger-led programs, re-enactors in the fort and trailheads for the Fort to Sea Trail and Netul River Trail as well as restrooms and a picnic area.

Map of Lewis and Clark NHP

Latitude, Longitude: 46.134506, -123.880070

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Activities

  • Camping

    Oregon's Fort Stevens State Park offers camping (tent, RV and yurt), beachcombing, freshwater lake swimming, trails, wildlife viewing, an historic shipwreck and an historic military area. A network of nine miles of bicycle trails and six miles of hiking trails allow you to explore the park through spruce and hemlock forests, wetlands, dunes, and shore pine. Coffenbury Lake has two swimming areas, a picnic area, restrooms, and a boat ramp (10 mph boating speed limit). Two other smaller lakes offer boat ramps for fishing and canoeing. Click for more information, including reservations.

    Washington's Cape Disappointment State Park (formerly Fort Canby State Park) is a 1,882-acre camping (tent & RV) park on the Long Beach Peninsula, fronted by the Pacific Ocean. The park offers 27 miles of ocean beach, two lighthouses, an interpretive center and hiking trails. Visitors enjoy beachcombing and exploring the area's rich natural and cultural history. Click for more information & reservations.

  • Hiking

    The Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks offer a number of hiking trails that follow similar routes to those taken by the Corps of Discovery. These trails feature stunning panoramic views and access to a wide variety of natural eco-systems. The trails in Cape Disappointment State Park and the Discovery Trail between Ilwaco and Long Beach allow visitors to explore the cape and beaches where the expedition first walked along the shore of the Pacific Ocean they had traveled so many miles to reach.

    Explore the Oregon coast on the Clatsop Loop Trail at Ecola State Park. The new interpretive Oregon Coast Trail's route over Tillamook Head is the park's backbone. Hiking options vary from round trip adventures to shorter hikes originating from Ecola Point leading to Indian Beach or descend a steeper and more difficult trail to Crescent Beach. Tillamook Head is where Captain William Clark and 12 members of the Corps of Discovery climbed over the rocky headland to view the whale that had reportedly washed ashore. Fort Stevens State Park has a network of six miles of hiking trails through spruce and hemlock forests, wetlands, dunes and shore pine. Dedicated in November 2005, the Fort To Sea Trail leads 6.5-miles from Fort Clatsop to Sunset Beach, traveling through the homeland of the Clatsop Indians, the forests, coastal rivers and lakes and traversing the coastal dunes.

  • Historic Sites

    Lewis and Clark National Historical Park is filled with national and state historical sites. Fort Clatsop was the winter encampment for the Corps of Discovery from December 1805 to March 1806. Clark's Dismal Nitch is a historic ditch where the Corps rested for coverage through a terrible winter storm. Watch a saltmaking reenactment every third weekend in August at The Salt Works.

  • Picnicking

    A picnic area is provided at the Fort Clatsop Center.

  • Wildlife Watching

    The Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge includes a chain of approximately 20 islands located along 27 miles of the Columbia River, from the mouth upstream nearly to Skamakowa, WA. The refuge, established in 1972, includes 35,000 acres of islands, bars, mud flats and tidal marshes. The islands, some sandbars that are covered in high tide, were formed as buildups of river silt. Some thousands of ducks, tundra swans and Canada geese gather on the islands each February and March before their northward migration. Many of these low, marshy islands are readily explored by kayak or watercraft. Please note that the Columbia River surrounding Lewis & Clark NWR is subject to large tidal swings. Because some of the lower islands can be entirely submerged at high tide, navigation can be challenging. Columbia River Kayaking (360) 795-0895 or www.columbiariverkayaking.com is a good source for local kayaking information.

Seasonality/Weather

The park is open every day of the year except December 25th. Costumed programs are scheduled during the summer months, beginning mid-June and ending Labor Day weekend.

Park Partners

Lewis & Clark National Park Association

The Lewis & Clark National Park Association is a non-profit organizationsupporting National Park Service educational and interpretive activities at the Fort Clatsop unit of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park. The association receives no public funds nor is it supported by any private endowment. It is run by a seven member board, who have employed an Executive Director, and staff to run the bookstore.

Highlights of their many years in the park include commissioning the bronze statue Arrival to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the Lewis and Clark Expedition; completing a successful fundraising effort to help build the visitor center facilities at Fort Clatsop; purchasing a major Lewis and Clark library for research at Fort Clatsop; publishing The Charbonneau Family Portrait, and two books on the plants of Fort Clatsop as well as educational resource guides for educators; buying 32 acres of land to the north of the park to protect important Park resource values and purchasing 61 acres to the south of Fort Clatsop for the new Netul Landing area. This scenic day use area along the Lewis and Clark River functions as the summer entrance to the park. The association has also contributed $15,000.00 to the creation of the Fort to Sea Trail, and has coordinated the contributions for the Fort-Rebuild effort.

Visit the organization website to learn more or to become a member.

(503) 861-4452

Directions

Driving

From Portland South: Take Highway 26 West to Seaside - go North on Hwy 101 approximately 15 miles North of Seaside - follow the brown national park signs - turn right on Alternate (business) 101 - go several miles - turn right on Fort Clatsop Road - follow signs From Portland North: Take I-5 North to Longview - take the Longview exit - Hwy 432 - proceed into Longview - make a left on Oregon Way - cross the Lewis and Clark Bridge into Oregon - turn right onto Hwy 30 West to Astoria - go through Astoria - go South on Hwy 101 into Warrenton (you'll see a Shilo Inn, Doogers, and Fred Meyer) - at Marlin make a left (light just South of Fred Meyer) - at the first stop sign - Alternate (business) 101 make a left - go several miles - turn right onto Fort Clatsop Road - follow signs

Flying

Portland Airport is the closest to the historical site.

Public Transportation

Sunset Empire Transportation (Oregon) Pacific Transit (Washington)

Phone Numbers

Primary

(503) 861-2471

Links