Mississinewa Lake

Quick Facts

Mississinewa Lake

Indiana

(765) 473-5946

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

In an area rich in Indian history, the 3,180 acre Mississinewa Lake includes both State and Corps managed recreation areas. The name, "Mississinewa" was derived for the Miami Indian word for "water on a slope." The lake exists as a cooperative management effort between the Corps of Engineers and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. The 3,180-acre lake provides flood reduction and a whole lot more. The Mississinewa Lake region offers many opportunities to enjoy wildlife or recreate in the great outdoors.

Map of Mississinewa Lake

Latitude, Longitude: 40.686366, -85.900726

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Activities

  • Boating

    All boating on Mississinewa Lake is managed by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. During the summer recreation season, Mississinewa Lake has 3,180 acres of water for boating. There are four concrete boat ramps with parking lots located at the four main recreation areas - Miami, Frances Slocum, Red Bridge, and Pearson Mill. Size, speed, and horsepower of boats on the lake are unlimited. Six car top public launching ramps are located at the lake. They are all located east of State Highway 13. These ramps are suitable for launching canoes or other watercraft which can be carried to the water. Launching permits are required by the State of Indiana. Daily or annual launch permits are available for purchase at the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Office at the Miami State Recreation Area. The only marina on the lake is located at Red Bridge Recreation Area.

  • Bicycling

    Bicycling is permitted on the roads around the lake.

  • Camping

    The campgrounds at Mississinewa Lake are located at the Miami State Recreation Area and are managed by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. 39 sites offer sewage access, water, electrical hookups, picnic tables, a parking spur, fire ring, modern restrooms and showers. 335 sites contain electrical hookups, picnic tables, fire rings, a parking spur, drinking water supply, modern restrooms and showers. 57 sites provide picnic tablea, fire ringa, a parking spur, drinking water supply, modern restrooms and showers, while 200 sites have picnic tables, fire rings, a parking spur, drinking water supply, and pit toilets. This last group of sites are considered primitive and have no access to modern restrooms or showers. Some sites are reservable on holiday weekends. All other sites are available on a first come, first served basis.

  • Fishing

    Enjoy good fishing opportunities at the Outlet and Peoria fishing sites in the reservoir tailwaters for walleye, channel catfish, flathead catfish, and white bass. The best months are March through November. Also enjoy seasonal opportunities for bass, crappie, and catfish in the reservoir. All Indiana fishing laws apply to the entire lake.

  • Hiking

    There are five hiking trails at the lake, ranging in length from .4 to 2.5 miles. One trail is paved for full access and others take visitors through forests, meadows and out to views of the lake and dam.

  • Historic Sites

    The area is rich in Indian history. Chief Francis Godfroy established the Miami Trading Post near the mouth of the Mississinewa in 1817. Frances Slocum was abducted as a child and raised by Miami Indians. She was referred to as the "White Rose of the Miami's," married an Osage War Chief, and settled in the Mississinewa Area. Both were buried on project land, and their burial sites were moved during lake construction.

  • Hunting

    The wildlife program at Mississinewa Lake is administered by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. All Indiana hunting and trapping laws apply to the entire lake.

    There are 12 self-serve hunter sign-in stations located throughout the property along access routes. Instructions and other hunter information are provided in each station. It is a property regulation that each hunter must obtain daily permission to hunt Mississinewa Lake property by signing in at a station and checking out at the hunt's or day's end. Additionally, a seasonal wildlife refuge exists on the north side of the lake between Mill Creek Pike and Wabash County Road 400W. This area is closed to the public between October 1 and January 15.

  • Picnicking

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has two picnic shelters available for reservation. One shelter is at the Observation Mound on the east end of the dam. The other shelter is at the Outlet Fishing Site near the dam. There is a new playground at the Outlet Fishing Site.

    The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has two reservable shelters at the Miami and Francis Slocum sites.

  • RVing

    There are 374 fully developed campsites with electrical hookups and modern restrooms and showers availible. Of these sites, 39 also have sewage hookups. Some sites are reservable on holiday weekends. All other sites are available on a first come, first served basis.

  • Water Sports

    Swimming is permitted at the Miami State Recreation Area from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. Facilities in the area include a sandy beach, picnic tables, changing/restroom facility, concessionaire, and drinking fountains. A fee is charged to enter the beach area during the recreation season. Some facilities, including the sandy beach, may be closed during the recreation season due to high lake elevations. Swimming, wading, snorkeling or scuba diving is at one's own risk, but it not permitted at boat launching sites, designated mooring points and public docks, or other areas so designated.

Directions

Driving

The lake is approximately 65 miles NE of Indianapolis. From Peru, drive south on IN 21, east on IN 400 and north on Rt. 550.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(765) 473-5946

Links