Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Quick Facts

Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Nevada

(702) 515-5225

Map Directions

Things To Do

   

Overview

The Moapa Valley Refuge was established on September 10, 1979, to secure habitat for the endangered Moapa dace. This small fish, the sole member of the genus Moapa, is endemic to the Muddy River system. Dace populations have declined due to habitat destruction and the introduction of nonnative fish species.

This modest refuge--106 acres--located in Clark County, Nevada, 60 miles north of Las Vegas, is critical to prevent extinction of the Moapa dace. Dace habitat on the refuge consists of stream channels supported by six thermal springs emerging near the center of the refuge. Moapa Refuge is a unit of the Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Due to its small size, fragile habitats, and on-going restoration work, the wildlife refuge is only open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, from sunrise to sunset. The refuge is open fall, winter, and spring starting with the Friday of Labor Day Weekend, and closing the Monday Holiday for Memorial Day Weekend.

Map of Moapa Valley NWR

Latitude, Longitude: 36.710816, -114.714603

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Activities

  • Bird Watching

    The palm trees and warm water springs afford thermal protection for many species of birds during the winter months. In particular, great horned owls roost in holes and openings among the matted and tangled palm tree skirts. White-crowned sparrows are present in large numbers, primarily in the upland areas. Belted kingfishers, California quail, turkey vultures and migratory birds are also seen on the refuge.

  • Wildlife Watching

    The Moapa Valley refuge was established to protect and enhance populations of Moapa dace. The Moapa dace are an endangered species found only on the refuge. The threatened desert tortoise may also occurs on the refuge.

    The Moapa Valley refuge was established for the purpuse of protecting and enhancing populations of Moapa Dace. The Moapa dace are an endangered species found only on the refuge. The threatened Desert tortoise potentially occurs on the refuge.

    Species of concern found on the refuge include the following invertebrates: Moapa pebblesnail, grated tryonia, Moapa warm spring riffle beetle, Amargosa naucorid, and the Moapa naucorid; fish: Moapa White River springfish; and birds: loggerhead shrike and phainopepla.

Seasonality/Weather

Moapa Valley, NV climate is very hot during summer when temperatures tend to be in the 90s and cool during winter when temperatures tend to be in the 50's. The warmest month of the year is July with an average maximum temperature of 99.99 degrees Fahrenheit, while the coldest month of the year is January with an average minimum temperature of 37.80 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperature variations between night and day tend to be moderate during summer with a difference that can reach 26 degrees Fahrenheit, and moderate during winter with an average difference of 21 degrees Fahrenheit. The annual average precipitation at Moapa Valley is 6.50 Inches. Rainfall in is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. The wettest month of the year is February with an average rainfall of 0.99 Inches.

Directions

Driving

From Las Vegas: Drive north on Interstate 15 to the Moapa/Glendale exit (#90). Go straight (northwest) on Highway 168 for 7.4 miles to Warm Springs Road. Turn left (southwest) on Warm Springs Road and drive for 1.4 more miles. The refuge is on your left, when you see the chain link fence on both sides of the road. From St. George, Utah or Mesquite, Nevada: Drive south on Interstate 15 to the Glendale/Moapa exit (#91). Turn left (southwest) onto E. Glendale Blvd. Merge/turn right (northwest) onto Highway 168 for 7.4 miles to Warm Springs Road. Turn left (southwest) on Warm Springs Road and drive for 1.4 more miles. The refuge is on your left.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(702) 515-5225

Links