Redding Recreation Management Area

Quick Facts

Redding Recreation Management Area

California

(530) 224-2100

Map

Things To Do

Overview

The Redding Field Office encompasses approximately 9,914,000 acres of outstanding recreation opportunities and natural wonders. In Shasta enjoy mountain biking on the Sacramento River Rail Trail, Mule Mountain Pass Trail, and Clear Creek Greenway. Popular with fisherman and pleasure boaters alike, the Wild and Scenic Trinity River from Lewiston to Pigeon Point is a class I and II segment that flows out of the Trinity and Lewiston Lakes. If you would like an adrenaline rush, the waters below Pigeon Point rage at class III-V. Lazily float down the Sacramento River in a raft or canoe. Enjoy developed campsites and primitive camping areas to make your stay more than a day trip. Fishing is a reviving activity that can be enjoyed at the Sacramento River, Trinity River and Keswick Reservoir. Whether you want to power your way up and down the river or relax and fish from the bank the Sacramento River is the place to be. From the hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding on the Sacramento River Rail Trail, Mule Mountain Pass Trail, and Clear Creek Greenway there are endless opportunities to get out and enjoy your public lands around Shasta. Most attractions along the Sacramento River Bend Area, in the Tehama Recreation area can be reached by foot, mountain bike or horseback. Hunters will find abundant deer, pigs and waterfowl in the Paynes Creek Wetlands. In addition, just 10 miles northwest of Redding, the Chappie-Shasta Off-Highway area offers 200 miles of roads and trails over 52,000 acres for OHV enthusiasts. This area is so large and has so many recreational opportunities to enjoy; you won't know where to begin!

Map of Redding Rec. Management Area

Latitude, Longitude: 40.573218, -122.367268

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Activities

  • Boating

    Popular with fisherman and pleasure boaters alike, the Wild and Scenic Trinity River from Lewiston to Pigeon Point is a class I and II segment that flows out of the Trinity and Lewiston Lakes. If you would like an adrenaline rush, the waters below Pigeon Point rage at class III-V. Lazily float down the Sacramento River in a raft or canoe.

  • Bicycling

    In Shasta enjoy mountain biking on the Sacramento River Rail Trail, Mule Mountain Pass Trail, and Clear Creek Greenway.

  • Camping

    There are three developed campsites available within the BLM Redding Resource area. All three campgrounds are in Trinity county - Douglas City, Junction City, and Steel Bridge campgrounds. Two primitive camping areas are available at Steiner Flat (Trinity River) and Stateline(Klamath River). There are many group camping areas, within the Redding Resource Area, available via permit such as Reading Island. To reserve the Reading Island group camping call (530) 224-2100.

  • Fishing

    Fishing is a reviving activity that can be enjoyed at the Sacramento River, Trinity River and Keswick Reservoir. Whether you want to power your way up and down the river or relax and fish from the bank the Sacramento River is the place to be. The Sacramento River in Shasta and Tehama counties is in pristine condition and provides public access to anglers and pleasure boaters just minutes from I-5. If you are looking for a drift boat experience or bank fishing head up to the Trinity River. Near the fishing resort town of Lewiston, the nationally recognized Wild and Scenic Trinity River emerges clear and cold from Clair Engle Lake and Lewiston Lake into a mountain valley. Fishing opportunities abound on this river.

    Bring your boat out to the cool waters of Keswick Reservoir and fish until your heart is content. If trout are what you are looking for...this is the place. This is also an excellent place to simply float around and enjoy nature and wonderful views of Shasta Dam. At the Keswick Boat Ramp there is also a trailhead for the beautiful Sacramento River Rail Trail.

  • Hiking

    From the hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding on the Sacramento River Rail Trail, Mule Mountain Pass Trail, and Clear Creek Greenway there are endless opportunities to get out and enjoy your public lands around Shasta.

    In the Tehama Recreation area, trailheads begin at Hog Lake Plateau, the Paynes Creek Recreation Area , Jelly's Ferry and multiple trailheads surround the Paynes Creek Wetlands. The Paynes Creek Wetlands trail systems and Hog Lake Plateau allow for great springtime wildlife viewing. The Yana Trail, with trailheads at Perry Riffle and Jelly's Ferry, is a great way to explore the backcountry.

    Twenty five miles Northeast of Chico, the beautiful Forks of Butte Recreation Area has trails through steep pine and fir covered canyons. Trails follow steep canyon walls; vegetation overstory is primarily mixed Ponderosa Pine, Douglas Fir and Madrone.

  • Horseback Riding

    In Shasta enjoy mountain biking and horseback riding on the Sacramento River Rail Trail, Mule Mountain Pass Trail, and Clear Creek Greenway.

  • Hunting

    Hunting is permitted on most public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) unless posted as closed (for example, hiking trails), developed recreation areas, and safety zones near housing. State of California hunting regulations must be followed. Game species found on BLM lands include quail, deer, waterfowl, dove, pig, bear and turkey. Seasons, closures, limits and other regulations are specified by the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG). For information about hunting regulations and Tehama Wildlife Area, contact the DFG regional office at by calling (530) 225-2300.

    Land inside the city limits of Redding (closed by local authority), the Horsetown Clear Creek preserve (an agreement is currently in effect with this preserve to close hunting in the area), land posted with no hunting signs by BLM and developed recreation facilities (some examples are campgrounds, parking lots and boat ramps) are not open to hunting.

  • Off Highway Vehicles

    Just 10 miles northwest of Redding, the Chappie-Shasta Off-Highway area offers 200 miles of roads and trails over 52,000 acres for OHV enthusiasts. Elevation within this area ranges from 600 to 5000 feet with a wide variety of topography, soil, and vegetation types. The southeastern portions offer rocky and challenging terrain, while the more remote northwestern portions offer scenic views of Mt. Shasta, Lake Shasta, and the Trinity Alps.

    Camping is also available adjacent to the staging area below Shasta Dam for a minimal fee. Due to Homeland Security guidelines, an access permit must be acquired at least 72 hours in advance in order to cross Shasta Dam. Permits are free and available throught the Shasta Dam Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The Copley Mountain staging area is now open as an alternate entrance to Chappie-Shasta OHV Area. No permit is required to access the Copley Mountain staging area.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(530) 224-2100

Links