Sumter National Forest

Quick Facts

Sumter National Forest

South Carolina

(803) 276-4810

Map

Things To Do

Overview

The Sumter National Forest consists of three ranger districts that comprise nearly 371,000 acres. It is unlike many forests in that its three ranger districts share no contiguous boundaries.

In the piedmont, the Enoree Ranger District has gained national recognition for outstanding work in natural resource management on the Indian Creek Wildlife Habitat Restoration Initiative. The Long Cane Ranger District is home to the Forks Area Trail System, a nationally-known mountain biking trail network. Both districts offer outstanding hiking, boating, hunting and equestrian opportunities.

The Andrew Pickens Ranger District is located in the mountainous western edge of the state, with elevations ranging from 800 to 3,400 feet. Certainly one of its crown jewels is the wild and scenic Chattooga River, a popular whitewater and angling destination. The Ellicott Rock Wilderness offers opportunities for solitude and primitive camping. The Andrew Pickens District has numerous waterfalls and hiking trails to satisfy every challenge level.

Map of Sumter Forest

Latitude, Longitude: 34.485360, -81.603510

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Activities

  • Boating

    The Chattooga River begins in mountainous North Carolina as small rivulets, nourished by springs and abundant rainfall, high on the slopes of the Appalachian Mountains--the start of a 50-mile journey that ends at Lake Tugaloo between South Carolina and Georgia, dropping almost ½ mile in elevation. Visitors to the forest can go for an exciting ride down the wild river.

  • Bicycling

    Sumter NF is famous for its mountain biking. The Forks Area Trail System, located in the Long Cane Ranger District, was designed with the mountain biking enthusiast in mind. Six stacked loops accessed from various locations, provide up to 34 miles of hiking or biking through a variety of topography and vegetation.

  • Hiking

    The forest has countless miles of hiking trails traversing all sorts of habitats. Check with the ranger offices for detailed information on hiking trails in specific areas.

  • Horseback Riding

    Horseback riding is very popular in the forest. Several horse trails and camps are located throughout the forest, offering plenty of options.

  • Hunting

    The Enoree and Long Cane districts of the Sumter National Forest provide a wide variety of habitats in the pine woods of the rolling hills of central South Carolina. Private agricultural land and mast producing hardwoods dot the landscape creating a good combination of food and cover for squirrels, deer, wild turkeys, rabbits, quails and woodcocks. The Andrew Pickens district in the mountains offers rugged terrain, hardwoods and several species of pine and provides the most challenging hunting experiences in South Carolina. This is one of the few places in the state where bear hunting is permitted. Also ruffed grouse can be found in preferred habitats at the higher elevations. The Enoree, Long Cane and Andrew Pickens Ranger Districts are laced with streams and rivers providing opportunities for duck hunting, especially for wood ducks. Woodcocks can also be found on all three districts in habitats with moist soil conditions (regeneration areas and along streams and wetlands).

  • Off Highway Vehicles

    The Sumter National Forest feature three off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails: Enoree OHV Trail, Cedar Springs OHV Trail, and Parson's Mountain OHV Trail. These trails are sometimes closed quickly to prevent resource damage. Be sure to CALL BEFORE YOU HAUL. Call the hot line number at (803) 561-4025 to make sure the trail you want to use is open. The trails are managed for all-terrain vehicles (ATV) and dirt bikes only: Jeeps, Hummers and other 4 X 4 vehicles are not allowed on trails. Maximum ATV width allowed on the trails is 50 inches. Riding is not permitted on Forest Service roads or in the general forest area. Be sure to follow all rules and safety regulations .

  • Water Sports

    The Chattooga River begins in mountainous North Carolina as small rivulets, nourished by springs and abundant rainfall, high on the slopes of the Appalachian Mountains--the start of a 50-mile journey that ends at Lake Tugaloo between South Carolina and Georgia, dropping almost ½ mile in elevation. Visitors to the forest can go for an exciting ride down the wild river.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(803) 276-4810

Links