Archaeology

Parks are Free During National Park Week 2012

April 20, 2012, 7:50 am
National Park Week 2012 begins this Saturday, April 21 and runs through April 29. During National Park Week, all 397 national parks in the country will have FREE admission! Parks will offer additional family friendly activities and events. Search the events calendar for National Park Week events near you. During ...

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White Mountain Petroglyphs : Visitor views Sandstone Carvings at White Mountain Petroglyphs
Visitor views Sandstone...
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White Mountain Petroglyphs
Barbara S...
Where do I complete your survey on state parks so that I may enter to win a pair of LEKI hiking poles?
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Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona, Ancient Cultures, Archaeology, Bird Watching, Native American History, Geology, Wildflowers, Camping
5 years ago
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Hi Barbara,

Thanks for your interest! The 2011 survey has been completed. We'll have plenty more opportunities to get involved with Oh, Ranger! in the future. If you'd like to stay in touch, sign up for our e-newsletter at http://www.facebook.com/OhRanger?sk=app_100265896690345.

5 years ago
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Experience Mount Rushmore in 3-D

Mount Rushmore in 3-D? Believe it. In addition to viewing the famous Mount Rushmore National Monumentmonument from afar in South Dakota, you can now take an intimate virtual tour of the site from your home computer.

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rfisher
I am quite interested in becoming a Park Ranger and was wondering what the marketability and annual pay of a Park Ranger is like.
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Canaan Resort State Park, West Virginia, Susquehanna State Park, Maryland, Archaeology, ATVs, Backpacking, Bears, Bouldering, Bow Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Biking, Downhill Skiing, Four-Wheel Driving, Gun Hunting, Wildlife Watching, Native American History, Swimming, Deer, Lake Fishing, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, Marine Life, Moose, Flora & Fauna, Mountain Lions, Historic Sites, Wolves, Caving, Camping, Climbing, Fishing, History/Culture, Golfing, Hiking, Hunting, Preservation, Picnicking
5 years ago
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We often get questions about what it takes to become a National Park Ranger. Here are some tips from our partners at the Association of National Park Rangers. We hope you find them helpful:

The National Park Service (NPS) employs people in all kinds of job titles (20,000 year-round and another 7,000 - 10,000 during the summer) even though the general public often thinks that everyone that works for the NPS is a "park ranger."  Of these 30,000 employees, perhaps 7,000 are in positions that are titled park ranger.  I'll concentrate on those for now, but folks interested in maintenance jobs, or administrative jobs, or research and science related jobs should know that those jobs are there too.
 
Park ranger jobs are divided into 2 groups.  First, there are park rangers that primarily perform park interpretation.  These employees work in the park visitors' center, lead guided walks and talks, give off-site programs at local schools, establish and/or modify the park's website, write site-specific brochures and other materials, and design visitor center displays or movies, etc.  In short, this group of park rangers is the parks' primary link between the park resources and park visitors and neighbors.  By explaining the national significance of the individual park and the resources it preserves, interpretive park rangers hope to establish or strengthen visitors' understanding and support for parks, the environment, history, etc.
 
The second group of park rangers are those that primarily perform park protection.  These employees perform law enforcement, search and rescue, emergency medical services, fire management, etc.  They are more likely to be working outside, in all kinds of weather conditions, and they might be doing this in all kinds of modes of transportation, i.e. on foot, on horseback, in vehicles, in boats, on skis, in small planes, etc.  Like interpretive rangers, protection rangers have a great responsibility to be knowledgeable about the parks' resources and threats (from human behavior) to them.  While they have many friendly, informational contacts with visitors, they also have visitor contacts that are sometimes confrontational and can be stressful.
 
For either type of ranger job, a bachelor's degree from a 4-year college or university with a heavy emphasis in the natural sciences or U.S. history is generally required to be competitive.  Any public speaking experience one can gain is also very helpful.  First aid training is available in most communities and having some level of certification in first aid and CPR is helpful.  There is also free online training to anyone at the Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands at Indiana University. Such training helps one understand the NPS mission and culture and shows prospective hiring officials that you are truly interested in becoming an NPS employee.
 
Many folks that hope to be interpretive park rangers often start out working as park volunteers while they are in school or are in some other full-time career.  These opportunities are available at all NPS sites including Lake Mead National Recreation Area just outside Las Vegas.
 
For protection rangers there are a few additional requirements.  You must be at least 21 years old.  You also must be a graduate of one of the NPS-approved Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Academies.  A list of these schools and more information is available online. One can also pursue similar opportunities in your home community to gain experience that might make you more competitive.  Become an ambulance attendant in your community, become a volunteer firefighter with your local fire department or your state forestry department, or become a member of your local community search and rescue squad.
 
Finally, the Association of National Park Rangers (ANPR) is a membership organization open to anyone.  One does not have to be a park ranger or an NPS employee to become an ANPR member.  There are networking and informational opportunities within ANPR that can help one be competitive for NPS jobs, and it is important to understand that it is not just what you know, but also who you know that will help one get their foot in the door with the NPS.  ANPR also offers a publication for sale titled, "Live the Adventure: Join the National Park Service" that can be helpful in understanding the requirements for park ranger jobs.  

For more information about ANPR visit their website.

5 years ago
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October 12th means Happy National Fossil Day!

Millions of years after animals roamed the earth, we are using their fossils to learn more about the time period in which they lived. Creatures that have been extinct and exist only in our imaginations can become real through fossil reseach.

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rpayne200...
Where can I find "Park-by-park highlights of the Grand Circle tour"? It seems you have a broken link when I try to go there.
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Ancient Cultures, Archaeology, Auto/Motorcycle, Wildlife Watching, Food/Dining, Fossils, River Rafting, Historic Sites, Lodging, Photography
6 years ago
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You're right! It looks like the folks who published that story have taken it off of their website.

Here's some other content that might help, though.

1) An overview of the Grand Circle

2) Visiting the Grand Circle on a Budget

Hope you have a wonderful trip!

6 years ago
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bevinpres...
Planning a trip to Southern Utah Is it reasonable to visit Eastern & Western attractions (NPs) in 7 days - 6 nights from Prescott, AZ?
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Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Zion National Park, Ancient Cultures, Archaeology, Auto/Motorcycle, Wildlife Watching, Bird Watching, Food/Dining, Native American History, Deer, Elk, Historic Sites, Wildflowers, Hiking, Lodging, Photography
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We suggest taking your time and choosing 3-4 parks to really enjoy, plus taking in some sights along the way. Your trip will lead you right through the heart of the Grand Circle, a collection of seven national parks, eight national monuments, numerous state parks, scenic byways, historical sites, prehistoric Indian ruins, colorful ghost towns and stunning geologic formations. Take some time to explore some of these places, including Zion, Canyonlands and Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.

For more information check out www.grandcircle.org and www.utah.com/nationalparks/grandcircle.htm. Some suggested itineraries are available at http://www.utah.com/itineraries/grand_circle.htm.

Also check out this list of park-by-park highlights in the Grand Circle.

6 years ago
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bobhaa
What is the weather like at Grand Canyon in September?
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Archaeology, Backpacking, Bears, Canoeing, Astronomy/Stargazing, Wildlife Watching, Bird Watching, Eco Tours, Swimming, Deer, Fossils, Guided Tours, Lake Fishing, Elk, Ranger-led Programs, River Rafting, Geology, Marine Life, Moose, Mountain Lions, Wildflowers, Wolves, Camping, Picnicking, RVing
6 years ago
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samwalsh
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  South Rim   North Rim   Inner Gorge
  Max Min Precip   Max Min Precip   Max Min Precip
May 70 39 0.66   62 34 1.17   92 63 0.36
June 81 47 0.42   73 40 0.86   101 72 0.30
July 84 54 1.81   77 46 1.93   106 78 0.84
August 82 53 2.25   75 45 2.85   103 75 1.40
September 76 47 1.56   69 39 1.99   97 69 0.97
6 years ago
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kyguy01
When was the most active sink-hole forming period in the Mammouth Cave area.
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Kentucky, Archaeology, Caving
6 years ago
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samwalsh
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As you approach the vincinity of Mammoth Cave, several clues suggest the existence of caves. Road cuts along highways have vertical exposures of layered grayish rock, often broken into irregular blocks at the top where erosion has widened vertical cracks across layers. Between the layers you may see the tiny openings in the limestone that are the first stage in the formation of a cave.

The landscape along the highway also has special characteristics. You will not see surface streams. Instead, you will see myriads of crater-like depressions called "sinkholes." These sinkholes are places where run-off may quickly enter the limestone aquifer. Cave drains carry the dissolved limestone away, and the surface soil settles, creating the bowl-shaped depression. If the sinkholes drains become plugged with soil, then the water cannot drain underground and a pond forms. Occasionally the drain becomes unplugged and a pond as large as several acres will disappear overnight.

This kind of landscape is calledkarst topography. It is found along and to the southeast of Interstate 65 near Mammoth Cave National Park and referred to as the Sinkhole plain. At its southeast edge, surface streams sink underground joining the drainage of thousands of sinkholes. Continuing northwest they become the underground rivers of Mammoth Cave.

Driving northwest from Cave City or Park City, you start to climb a line of bluffs rising some 300 feet above the sinkhole plain. These bluffs are the Chester Escarpment—the border between the unprotected limestone of the Sinkhole Plain and the Mammoth Cave Plateau.


6 years ago
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