Brazos Bend State Park

Quick Facts

Brazos Bend State Park

Texas

(979) 553-5102

Map Directions

Things To Do

Overview

Brazos Bend State Park, approximately 28 miles southwest of Houston, covers roughly 5000 acres, with an eastern boundary of 3.2 miles fronting on the Brazos River on the southeast border of Fort Bend County. This was the area of Texas' first Anglo colonization. It was purchased by the state in 1976-77 and was opened to the public in 1984.

Archeological materials show that prehistoric people visited this area, possibly as early as 300 BC; in early historical times, the Capoque band of the Karankawa Indians roamed between the mouth of the Brazos River and Galveston Bay and may have traveled inland as far as Brazos Bend. In the early 19th century, this area of Texas was the site of Stephen F. Austin's first colonial land grant from Mexico, and present park land was included in a grant to Abner Harris and a partner named William Barrett in 1827. Most of riverfront was sold shortly after the Texas Revolution, and records show that in 1845, part of the park and 2400 feet of river frontage were in the hands of cotton brokers who lived in Brazoria. At the time, the Brazos River was one of the principal routes of commerce, and it may be that the brokerage firm used the area for one of its riverboat landings. In recent times, the land on which the park is located was used for cattle grazing, pecan harvesting, and as a private hunting preserve. The Nature Center is open Monday - Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The George Observatory is located in the park and is open Saturdays from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Other activities include camping, picnicking, hiking, biking, equestrian, and fishing.

Map of Brazos Bend (TX)

Latitude, Longitude: 29.372660, -95.631624

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Activities

  • Bicycling

    Hike and Bike/Foot Trials: Hike and bike trails are located around 40-Acre, Elm and Hale Lakes and interconnect. Alligator viewing is best from the 40-Acre and Elm Lake Trail system. Foot trials take visitors off the beaten path into the hardwood forest. An Outdoor Guidebook will assist visitors in learning about the parks different ecosystems and outdoor safety. The guidebook is available on the volunteer web site or for sale only at the Nature Center Gift Shop.

  • Camping

    Facilities include restrooms with showers; campsites with water and electricity; screened shelters; primitive equestrian campsites; a trailer dump station.

  • Fishing

    Six lakes are easily accessible to fishermen, with piers located at 40-Acre, Elm and Hale Lakes. Visitors are cautioned to pay due respect to alligators, which are numerous in some areas of the park.

  • Hiking

    Creekfield Lake Nature Trail is an accessible nature trail and interpretive exhibit pilot project is the first of its kind for the department (1995) and was designed with the assistance of the greater Houston area disabled community in partnership with The George Foundation, Fort Bend County, and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The trail is fully paved and takes visitor on a .5 mile loop the wetland area. Exciting features along this trail include a series of interpretive panels with tactile bronzes of wetland wildlife, and accessible boardwalk and observation deck for wildlife viewing, rest areas with shaded benches, A self-guided manual and scavenger hunt is available at Park Headquarters and Nature Center or from the volunteer web site.

    Hike and Bike/Foot Trials: There are 35 miles of hiking and biking trails located around 40-Acre, Elm and Hale Lakes and interconnect. Alligator viewing is best from the 40-Acre and Elm Lake Trail system. Foot trials take visitors off the beaten path into the hardwood forest. An Outdoor Guidebook will assist visitors in learning about the parks different ecosystems and outdoor safety. The guidebook is available on the volunteer web site or for sale only at the Nature Center Gift Shop.

  • Horseback Riding

    There is 8 miles of equestrian trails and primitive equestrian campsites.

  • Picnicking

    Picnicking areas are located through-out the park.

  • RVing

    Campground is equiped to handle larger RVs. Electricity and dump station available.

Seasonality/Weather

There are at least three free interpretive programs and hikes offered every weekend. Interpretive staff and volunteers offer weekday guided hikes and programs for schools and other educational organizations. Fees and reservations required. The Nature Center is open Monday - Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.. It's "Habitats and Niches" display offers an unusual "hands-on" alligator discovery area, a tactile model of the park, freshwater aquarium, live native snake species, a touch table and an open-captioned orientation video for all visitors including those with hearing impairments. The George Observatory is located in the park and is open Saturdays from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. For information on stargazing programs/passes and other programs, call the Observatory at 979-553-3400 or at 281-242-3055

Directions

Driving

The park is approximately a one-hour drive from downtown Houston. Take Highway 59 South to the Crabb River Road exit. You may also take State Highway 288 south to FM 1462 West. Follow FM 1462 to FM 762 North. From the south follow State Highway 288 North to the FM 1462 exit or take State Highway 36 to FM 1462 East. All routes are marked with brown signs to guide you.

Phone Numbers

Primary

(979) 553-5102

Links