Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

Trails of Yellowstone

These self-guiding trails are easy walks on which most points of interest are labeled to foster a greater understanding of nature. For more information, see Yellowstone Today or consult the self-guiding pamphlets available at visitor centers and trailheads. Addional trails wind throughout the park; check at a ranger station or visitor center for information.

Mammoth Country

Below are descriptions of some self-guiding park trails. They are easy walks on which most points of interest are labeled to foster a greater understanding of nature. For more information, see Yellowstone Today or consult the self-guiding pamphlets available at visitor centers and trailheads. Space does not permit descriptions of the numerous other trails that wind through the park, so check at a ranger station or visitor center for information.

Mammoth Country 

The Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces provide a fascinating thermal area to explore. A self-guiding trail will take you around the travertine terraces. Always stay on the boardwalks and trails to protect yourself and the delicate features. This region is home to the rugged Gallatin Range, fossil forests, and numerous lakes and creeks.

Geyser Country 

Fountain Paint Pot Nature Trail's active and colorful mud pots make for a fascinating walk. Norris Geyser Basin has both geysers and hot springs that are among the hottest in the park, and you can explore them on trails that start from the museum. Always stay on boardwalks and trails. Some great, longer hikes explore this region, which has 21 of the park's 290 known waterfalls (15-feet drop or greater).

Lake Country 

West Thumb Geyser Basin is where hot springs converge with Yellowstone Lake. Please stay on the trails and boardwalks. Longer hikes travel through this beautiful region. Yellowstone Lake, the Snake and upper Yellowstone rivers, and the Absaroka Range are the outstanding features of this area. 

Roosevelt Country 

Calcite Springs Overlook and Tower Fall trails have stunning overlooks of their namesakes, as well as of interesting geologic formations. Longer trails explore the region, which has such noteworthy features as Lamar Valley, sparkling trout streams, fossil trees and craggy mountains.

Canyon Country 

Mud Volcano, with its extraordinary thermal features, is just one of many short trails in the region. Other trails lead to overlooks of Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and Upper and Lower falls, and travel along the canyon rims and into the canyon itself.