John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Forests/Natural Areas in John Day

Amphibians At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Amphibians The John Day Fossil Beds will never be known as an amphibian mecca. But it does harbor some unique seeps and springs within the boundaries that provide "islands" of habitat for amphibians. Predation by birds, fish and the introduced bullfrog hamper most amphibians along the John Day River. But ...

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Birds At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Birds Birds remain the most visible animals found at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. The changing of the seasons add to the variety of birds seen as migrants pass through and summer species leave for warmer climes. Over 50 species of birds can be seen at the monument with ...

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Environmental Factors At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Environmental Factors The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument may seem harsh and unchanging when temperatures on a hot summer day rise above 100 degrees fahrenheit or a cold, below zero winter morning. Its semi-desert ecosystem is split by the life-giving waters of the John Day River and its tributaries. ...

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Fish At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Fish The John Day River remains the longest undammed tributary of the mighty Columbia River. With only two dams below the confluence with the Columbia and hundreds of river miles of spawning habitat scattered among its many tributaries, the John Day River serves as a vital spawning ground for ...

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Grasses At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Grasses Grasses are a natural component of the grass/sagebrush steppe environment found in the John Day Fossil Beds. Even with onslaughts from encroaching juniper and invading grasses and forbs like medusahead rye or Dalmation toadflax, there are still many nearly pristine areas within the monument that have healthy plant communities ...

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Mammals At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Mammals With over 40 million years of fossilized history related to the evolution of mammals in the region, it would be fun to come to the John Day Fossil Beds to see an entelodont (pig and hippo relative), diceratherium (rhino relative), miohippus (horse relative), brontothere (thunder beast) or pogonodon ...

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Nonnative Species At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Nonnative Species NON-NATIVE SPECIES With the discovery of gold in the upper John Day River area in the late 1860's, the large influx of Anglo-Americans has brought both major and subtle changes to the entire basin. The development of hay meadows in the river bottoms would soon remove many ...

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Reptiles At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Reptiles With a semi-arid climate and interspersed habitats from riparian areas, to grass/sagebrush steppe, to rocky basalt outcroppings, the John Day Fossil Beds is a prime area for many of the reptile species found in the region. On a nice morning in the summer, visitors hiking one of the ...

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Stargazing At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Stargazing ?June 20 at 9:00 pm at the Painted Hills Unit. ?July 18 at 9:00 pm at the Sheep Rock Unit Thomas Condon Paleontology Center. ?September 6 8:00 pm at the Painted Hills Unit. Join a ranger for a two hour exploration of the starry night sky by telescope. You should dress ...

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Wildflowers At John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Wildflowers During the spring and early summer months a great variety of wild flowers are in bloom at the monument. Despite the rugged conditions and poor soil, many of these plants flourish, if only for a few weeks. The Painted Hills unit of the park is a favorite ...

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