Mount Rainier National Park

Mount Rainier National Park

Animals at Mt Rainier

Bald eagle (Haliaetus leucocephalus) 

Living in coastal woodlands and along waterways, the bald eagle feeds on fish it grabs from the water with its talons, as well as salmon carcasses. Although still a threatened species in the lower 48 states, bald eagle populations are slowly recovering. With the exception of Alaska, Washington State is home to the largest population of bald eagles in the U.S.

 

Black bear (Ursus americanus) 

Bald eagle (Haliaetus leucocephalus) 

Living in coastal woodlands and along waterways, the bald eagle feeds on fish it grabs from the water with its talons, as well as salmon carcasses. Although still a threatened species in the lower 48 states, bald eagle populations are slowly recovering. With the exception of Alaska, Washington State is home to the largest population of bald eagles in the U.S.

 

Black bear (Ursus americanus)

It is unlikely that you'll encounter a black bear, one of two large predators in the parks (the other is the mountain lion). Active from spring through fall, it moves through the woods and mountains eating berries, fish or whatever food it can find. By fall, it claims a den beneath a rock or fallen tree to sleep for the winter. 

 

Elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti)

A larger subspecies of the North American elk, the Roosevelt elk lives in the Pacific Northwest where it browses among the lowland and rain forests and open meadows of the upper zones. Protection of the elk was a primary reason for the creation of Olympic National Park. Descendants of the introduced Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus melsoni) occupy a similar habitat in Mount Rainier National Park.

Marmot (Marmota)

The Olympic marmot (Marmota olympus) and the hoary marmot (Marmota caligata), relatives of the ground squirrel, live in subalpine meadows and alpine tundra. They whistle a high-pitched alarm call when disturbed. Every morning, these sociable creatures visit each other's burrows. During hibernation, for eight to nine months, a marmot's heartbeat slows from 130-140 beats per minute to four per minute. 

Ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus)

Among the best known of all marine invertebrates, the ochre sea stars are characterized by their five-armed shape. Their hues range from orange to brown to purple and they usually grow to be 10 to 12 inches across. Ochre sea stars are ravenous hunters, feeding on mussels, snails and other slow moving creatures, and they are common on rocks and in tidepools at Olympic National Park.

 

Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)

One of the most striking features of the Steller's jay is its crest and vibrant blue and black color. The bird's distinct cry sounds like, "SHAACK! SHAACK!," however the Steller's jay has a talent for mimicking other birds' calls including those of hawks and warblers. Steller's jay has the most extensive range of any North American jay—from Alaska to central California and through the Rocky Mountains.